Jazz with Bob Perkins

Monday through Thursday, 6 to 9 pm; Sunday, 9 am to 1 pm

Lovingly known as “BP with the GM” (Bob Perkins with the Good Music), BP brings you that good music just in time for dinner during your work week, and keeps your Sunday brunch swinging. His selections are like a familiar hug from Jazz Land featuring your favorite standards and vocalists such as Sarah, Ella, and Nat, some Big Band legends including the Duke and the Count, and the giants of the instrumentals like Lee Morgan, Hank Crawford, Miles, and Coltrane. Take a listen to "Ol' BP" as he calls himself...you'll be back again and again.

Take a look at this photo album of Mr. Perkins through the years.

Scroll down to see recent playlists.

In 1959, the peak of his playing years, Thelonious Monk did something he'd never done before: record music for a film. Released in the U.S. as Dangerous Liaisons, the French film Les Liaisons Dangereuses featured nearly 30 minutes of Monk's music, none of which ever made it to a record. But the master tapes resurfaced last year, and were first released as a vinyl exclusive on Record Store Day this April.

The songs, or standards, known to us today as "The Great American Songbook" flourished from the mid 1920s to about 1950. Singer Carmen McRae popularized the term with her 1972 album, The Great American Songbook. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, a new book on the subject shines light on the role of jazz in the rise, fall, and rebirth of these great American songs.


The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Jazz Masters award, which comes with a $25,000 prize, is widely described as United States' highest honor for jazz. Today, the NEA announced its four newest recipients of the prize: pianist Joanne Brackeen, guitarist Pat Metheny, singer Dianne Reeves and producer Todd Barkan.

“Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’, ” “My Funny Valentine,” “The Lady is a Tramp,” “The Sound of Music." With over 900 songs to his name, composer Richard Rodgers (1902-1979) left an indelible mark on American musical theater. His songs became an important part of the Great American Songbook, in part because jazz artists and singers loved to re-invent them. If Rodgers had had his way, though, he wouldn’t have let anyone else change a note. Why not?

Cut the WRTI Spring Member Drive in Half!

May 24, 2017

We’ve never done this before. Our goal for the upcoming Spring Member Drive is to raise all the money in half the time. We can do that only if your goal is to contribute nowbefore the drive begins on May 1st. Simply put, All the Members in Half the Time equals more music and fewer interruptions. Just the way you like it.

You’ve heard that we’re cutting our Spring Member Drive in half, and it’s starting now! For a limited time, we have a 500-member goal challenge. How does it work? TODAY ONLY, when you and 499 other listeners each make a contribution (in any amount), you’ll unlock an additional $10,000 donation from a group of generous friends of WRTI who’ve contributed to the Member Match Fund. But, you only have until 8 o’clock tonight to meet this challenge!

Donate Now to Enter Two Amazing Contests!

May 24, 2017

Any day the sun comes up is a good day to listen to the music on WRTI. Whether you listen a little or a lot—you play an essential role in making music happen on WRTI.

All Memorial Day Weekend: Double Takes on WRTI!

May 24, 2017

Wait, what... it’s summer already?! We’re doing a “Double Take Memorial Day Weekend” at WRTI with the unofficial start of summer, Memorial Day Weekend. Hear “double takes” of your favorite classical composers and jazz standards. And of course, we’ll play classical and jazz favorites all weekend long as we honor the meaning of Memorial Day.

We’ve never done this before. We’re taking a risk and cutting the WRTI Spring Member Drive to just 5½ days. Our goal is to have all the members support the music in half the time. We can do that only if your goal is to contribute now!

The Jazz Sanctuary is an organization that takes jazz into houses of worship and other nontraditional venues. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, founder Alan Segal says jazz and the spiritual community drove his recovery from a life-threatening crisis.

Pages