Jazz with Bob Perkins

Monday through Thursday, 6 to 9 pm

Lovingly known as “BP with the GM” (Bob Perkins with the Good Music), BP brings you that good music just in time for dinner during your work week. His selections are like a familiar hug from Jazz Land featuring your favorite standards and vocalists such as Sarah, Ella, and Nat, some Big Band legends including the Duke and the Count, and the giants of the instrumentals like Lee Morgan, Hank Crawford, Miles, and Coltrane. Take a listen to "Ol' BP" as he calls himself...you'll be back again and again.

Take a look at this photo album of Mr. Perkins through the years.

Scroll down to see recent playlists.

Looking for the perfect soundtrack for the holidays? Tired of the same old music? We've got a fix for that. We asked WRTI’s hosts and arts reporters to tell us their go-to holiday favorites. Here are their answers, and the memories, feelings, or just beautiful sounds that inspired them.

Tenor sax player, composer, and arranger Tim Warfield has been performing professionally since he was sixteen. He was able to improvise at a very early age and says that by now he thinks of the saxophone as an extension of himself.

Your contribution to WRTI on Giving Tuesday, November 28th, will also support Musicopia. How? The Rothman Institute and a group of anonymous donors have stepped up to match every gift to WRTI on Giving Tuesday with an equal gift to Musicopia.

The film I Called Him Morgan tells of the rise and tragic fall of trumpeter Lee Morgan, who grew up in Philadelphia.  WRTI’s Susan Lewis talked with sax master Odean Pope about his memories of Morgan, who in his short life made a long-lasting contribution.

Halloween is here, so join us for some deliciously spooky classical music and jazz all day long on October 31st.

Jazz pianist and singer Nat "King" Cole, the first African American to host his own TV variety show in 1956, was known for his great talent and his grace, even in the face of mistreatment and racial discrimination. WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports on a new play that explores what this grace must have cost him.

Credit: William P. Gottlieb

A romantic ballad launched one career, revived another, and became a beloved standard for generations of musicians. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Thelonious Monk's " ‘Round Midnight." The work was recorded first in 1944—but not by Monk.


Sharon Torello

Former Congressman Barney Frank was on stage at Chamber Orchestra FIRST EDITIONS concerts in Swarthmore, Haverford, and Center City last week to narrate a classic 1962 work in the style of Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf, but with a jazz twist.


When David-Michael Kenney returned to Philadelphia from California, he walked down the Avenue of the Arts past the "Walk of Fame" plaques. He noticed the nameplates of the local music greats were quite tarnished.

Check out a great book, all about the tunes that put the "roar" in "The Roaring Twenties." WRTI's Susan Lewis spoke with the author of Tunes of the Twenties and All That Jazz: The Stories Behind the Songs.

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