Jazz with Jeff Duperon

Friday, 6 to 10 pm

Kick off your weekend with Jeff Duperon as he takes a cruise through the current.

Composer ID: 
53c7dcaae1c8c27e811ab2b6|53c7dca6e1c8c27e811ab2ae

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
6:06 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Bruce Lundvall, Jazz Record Executive, Has Died

Bruce Lundvall attends a ceremony hosted by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, which produces the Grammy Awards. In addition to his role as record executive, he also once served as director of the Recording Academy.
Noel Vasquez Getty Images

Bruce Lundvall, the longtime President of Blue Note Records who supported many top jazz artists over the last four decades, died yesterday, May 19. The cause was complications of Parkinson's Disease, according to a Blue Note statement. He was 79.

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WRTI Spotlight
3:43 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Military Jazz Bands Throughout Memorial Day Weekend on WRTI

Airmen of Note

Join us from Friday, May 22 to Monday, May 25 during jazz hours as we remember those who fought for our country by presenting jazz performed by United States military bands. Jeff Duperon kicks off the festivities on Friday, May 22nd at 6 pm with music from The West Point Jazz Knights, the U.S. Army Blues, and many other military bands, old and new. This music continues all weekend long, until the Hot 11 Countdown kicks off at 10:30 pm on Monday.  

WRTI Picks from NPR Music
7:14 am
Fri May 15, 2015

B.B. King, Legendary Blues Guitarist, Dies At 89

B.B. King performs at Bluesfest Music Festival in Byron Bay, Australia, in 2011.
Mark Metcalfe Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 2:11 pm

It seemed as if he'd go on forever — and B.B. King was working right up until the end. It's what he loved to do: playing music, and fishing. Even late in life, living with diabetes, he spent about half the year on the road. King died Thursday night at home in Las Vegas. He was 89 years old.

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Jazz Appreciation Month 2015
2:43 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

WRTI Jazz Hosts Share Their Favorite Hidden Gems!

For the final week of Jazz Appreciation Month, we're presenting our favorite hidden gems from our jazz library. Join us at 7 pm, 9:30 pm, 12:30 am and 5:30 am as we uncover these precious pieces, and tell you why they are so special to us.  Bob Perkins, Zivit, Jeff Duperon, Maureen Malloy, Bob Craig and J. Michael Harrison have had a blast featuring their favorites for you this April. Please continue to tune into the station that appreciates jazz every month!

1. Bob Perkins: Patrick Williams Big Band - Mandeville - Aurora

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Jazz Appreciation Month Local Favorites
12:52 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Appreciating The Jazz In Our Own Backyard!

MINAS, Orlando Haddad and Patricia King

Our Jazz Appreciation Month celebration continues during the week of April 20th by shining the spotlight on artists right here in our region. Our jazz hosts present their favorite recordings from a local jazz artist each night at 7 pm, 9:30 pm 12:30 am, and 5:30 am.

Bob Craig, Zivit, Bob Perkins, Jeff Duperon, Maureen Malloy and J. Michael Harrison have some great tunes cued up for you! Here are some of their favorites:

1. Jeff Duperon: Orrin Evans - Don't Fall Off the L.E.J - Captain Black

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Jazz Appreciation Month 2015
12:36 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

WRTI Jazz Hosts Share Their Favorite Live Recordings!

Our Jazz Appreciation Month celebration continues this week as we present our favorite live jazz recordings. Tune in during the week of April 13th at 7 pm, 9:30 pm, 12:30 am and 5:30 am to hear top live jazz picks from Bob Perkins, Jeff Duperon, Zivit, J. Michael Harrison, Bob Craig, and Maureen Malloy.

Listen to our hosts discuss their favorite live recordings below.

1.  Zivit - Bill Evans - "My Man's Gone Now" - Sunday at the Village Vanguard

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The Bridge with J. Michael Harrison
1:30 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Uri Caine and PRISM Quartet's Matt Levy on WRTI's THE BRIDGE: Friday, April 10, 10:45 PM

WRTI jazz host J. Michael Harrison speaks with Uri Caine and Matt Levy at the WRTI studios.

Join WRTI jazz host J. Michael Harrison on Friday, April 10 at 10:45 pm for music and conversation with Grammy-nominated pianist and composer Uri Caine and PRISM saxophone quartet's Matt Levy.

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Jazz Appreciation Month 2015
11:25 am
Tue April 7, 2015

It's Vintage Jazz Week on WRTI

Jazz Appreciation Month continues on WRTI! During the week of April 6th, 2015, we're sharing our favorite vintage jazz recordings.  Tune in to hear top favorites from Bob Perkins, Jeff Duperon, Zivit, J. Michael Harrison, Bob Craig, and Maureen Malloy throughout the week at 7 pm, 9:30 pm, 12:30 am and 5:30 am.

Listen to our hosts discuss their vintage jazz favorites below.

1. Bob Perkins: Modern Jazz Quartet - "Django" - Django 

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Latest From ICON Magazine
5:25 pm
Mon April 6, 2015

Oliver Nelson, One More Who Died Too Young

Oliver Nelson

Many talented souls in various walks of life have departed the planet well before their loved ones thought they should have. The abbreviated stays of the gifted makes us ponder what other wonders they might have contributed, had they lived.

Oliver Nelson comes to mind. He was less famous than Clifford Brown or Charlie Parker or John Coltrane, all of whom were innovators and pioneers and who died well before their time. But Nelson was not only a gifted multi-instrumentalist but also a top-flight arranger and composer. He advanced the careers of many performers, and not just those in jazz.

I first heard of Nelson in the early 1960s via his composition “Stolen Moments,” which became a jazz classic. A few years later I broke into radio and began hosting a jazz program. He then became an even more familiar name to me, because I played his music on the air.

Oliver Nelson’s “Stolen Moments” with Nelson on tenor saxophone, Freddie Hubbard on trumpet, et al.:

Oliver Nelson was born into a musical family on June 4, 1932 in St. Louis. He played piano at age six, and several years later, the saxophone. He got his first major job with Louis Jordan while still in his teens, playing alto saxophone and arranging. Military service called, and he joined a band in the Marine Corps. While traveling in Tokyo, he heard the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra, which he credited with whetting his appetite to become more advanced as an arranger.

After the military, Nelson studied harmony and theory at Washington and Lincoln Universities and privately. He moved to New York City and made music with Erskine Hawkins, organist Wild Bill Davis and a host of other established musicians. He also landed a job as house arranger for the Apollo Theater.

Prestige Records signed Nelson to a contract, and he recorded six albums for them. He later moved to the Impulse label and recorded The Blues and the Abstract Truth, a landmark LP that included “Stolen Moments.” It’s a work of art. With the likes of pianist Bill Evans, bassist Paul Chambers, drummer Roy Haynes, Eric Dolphy doubling on also sax and flute, Freddie Hubbard on trumpet, and Nelson on tenor sax—how could it not be the monster that it was? It still is.

Doors began to open. Not only was he producing and arranging for Nancy Wilson, James Brown, the Temptations, Diana Ross, organist Jimmy Smith, and other well-known artists, he was also composing for TV shows, including Ironside, Longstreet, and The Six Million Dollar Man (for which he wrote the theme). He also arranged the music for the motion picture Last Tango in Paris.

Those close to him knew he was spreading his gargantuan talents too thin by racing from the East Coast to perform with his jazz group, then to the West Coast for music-arranging jobs. Their concern for his well-being turned out not to be an abstract truth: Nelson suffered a massive heart attack in Los Angeles in 1975, and died at the age of 43. The word was that he had literally worked himself to death. So, Oliver Nelson, like some of his ever-youthful jazz predecessors, left while still having much more to say. But he, like they, kicked up a lot of creative dust prior to departing.

One of his best CDs (besides The Blues and the Abstract Truth) is one he shares with vibraphonist Lem Winchester, Nocturne. Oliver Nelson’s solos on “Azur’te” and “Man with a Horn” please the ear and massage the heart.

Oliver Nelson, Lem Winchester, “Man With a Horn”:

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Latest from ICON Magazine
7:26 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

The Particular Nature of Duane Eubanks

Duane Eubanks (photo credit: Gulnara Khamatova)

Trumpeter Duane Eubanks isn’t yet as well known as his brothers (trombonist Robin and guitarist Kevin), but his highly listenable album, Things Of A Particular Nature, should mitigate his under-the-radar status. This Philadelphia native is a top-notch musician, having fronted the horn section in the late pianist Mulgrew Miller’s group, Wingspan, and as a member of two-time Grammy-winning Dave Holland Big Band, while playing with many others.

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