Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection

The first Saturday of each month, 5 to 6 pm

In Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, we uncover the unknown, rediscover the little-known, and take a fresh look at some of the remarkable treasures housed in the Edwin A. Fleisher Collection of Orchestral Music in the Free Library of Philadelphia. The Fleisher Collection is the largest lending library of orchestral performance material in the world.

Composer ID: 
51802772e1c8619119d82545|51802729e1c8619119d82533

Playlist

December 01, 2012

5:01 PM
Fantastic Variations on an old Rhyme
Artist :
Album :
Composer : Havergal Brian
Catalog : 223731 CD
Conductor : Andrew Penny
Orchestra : Ukrainian National Symphony Or
Label : MarcoPolo
5:13 PM
Tone Poem: In Memoriam
Artist :
Album :
Composer : Havergal Brian
Catalog : 223481 CD
Conductor : Adrian Leaper
Orchestra : RTE National Sym Orch Ireland
Label : MarcoPolo
5:34 PM
Helios Overture Op 17
Artist :
Album :
Composer : Carl Nielsen
Catalog : 6533 CD
Conductor : Sir Alexander Gibson
Orchestra : Royal Scottish National Orch
Label : Chandos
5:50 PM
Festal Dance
Artist :
Album :
Composer : Havergal Brian
Catalog : 223481 CD
Conductor : Adrian Leaper
Orchestra : RTE National Sym Orch Ireland
Label : MarcoPolo

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
12:47 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

Karol Szymanowski: Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Oct. 13th, 5 pm

Karol Szymanowski, 1935

Squeezed between a Russian revolution that destroyed his home, and a world war that destroyed the rest, Karol Szymanowski finally found escape in the art that had so long eluded him.

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
3:57 pm
Sat September 1, 2012

Not What the Composer Had in Mind: Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Sept. 1st, 5 pm

Johann Sebastian Bach

Music will always challenge our assumptions...if we let it. For a couple of generations now, those who unearthed music from earlier times have wanted to play it the way it sounded in those earlier times. These “authentic” or “historically informed” performances open our ears to new delights hidden in Medieval and Renaissance music. As playing techniques and instruments improved, the movement grew to encompass Baroque and Classical music. Even Romantic and later music has been influenced by the growing research. We can now listen to Brahms symphonies on “original” instruments.

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
6:45 pm
Mon July 30, 2012

Mostly Ravel on Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection: August 4th, 5 pm

Maurice Ravel

This time, he’d show them. The Paris Conservatoire accepted Ravel as a piano student at age 16, and even though he won a piano competition, more than anything he wanted to compose. But the Conservatory was a hard place. He never won the fugue prize, never won the composition prize, never won anything for writing music and they sent him packing. Twice. He studied with the great Gabriel Fauré, in school and out, but he just couldn’t make any headway with the ruling musical authorities.

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
12:59 pm
Sat July 7, 2012

John Philip Sousa on Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection: July 7th at 5 pm

John Philip Sousa

The circus came to town, and the music director, walking through the streets, heard a violin beautifully played from a house he was passing by. He knocked on the door, and offered a job to the 13-year-old boy who was practicing. The boy, always independent (he had started his own dance orchestra two years earlier), decided to run away the next day and, yes, to join the circus. But his father got wind of it and the next morning marched him to the Marines, apprenticing him to the band there. The father could do that, because he played trombone in the United States Marine Band.

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
2:59 pm
Sat June 2, 2012

Ralph Vaughan Williams on Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection

Join us on Saturday, June 2nd from 5 to 6 pm for a look into the life of composer and conductor Ralph Vaughan Williams.

Even though descended from the Wedgwood family of pottery fame, and with Charles Darwin as a grand-uncle, Ralph Vaughan Williams was more common man than society type. The world-famous composer and esteemed professor at the Royal College of Music was once mistaken for a vagabond in his own hometown, dressed in ragged clothes and pushing a cart gathering aluminum for the war effort.

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
7:09 am
Sat May 5, 2012

Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection: The Story of Paul Hindemith on May 5th

Composer Paul Hindemith is in the spotlight on Saturday, May 5th at 5 pm. Your hosts Kile Smith and Jack Moore tell the tale and play the music of Hindemith - once the darling of new music and his German rulers, he ran afoul of both groups, and then it seemed as if nothing was going right.
 

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
1:28 pm
Sat March 10, 2012

The Great American Composer and Conductor Howard Hanson

An ancient Roman seeking signs from the flights of birds would climb the Janiculum hill, overlooking the city from the west, across the Tiber. If an augur had been stationed there in 1921, he might just as well have considered the progress of a young Howard Hanson, from Wahoo, Nebraska, son of Swedish immigrants, and the first winner of the American Rome Prize for musical composition. Hanson lived for three years at the American Academy in Rome, which sits on that very hill.

Program:

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
11:18 am
Sat February 4, 2012

The Music of Igor Stravinsky

Rimsky-Korsakov was not a man given to high praise. So when he wrote the words "Not bad" in his diary about the music of one of his students, that was unusually complimentary. The student was Igor Stravinsky.

Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971). Symphony No. 1 (1907). Scottish National Orchestra, Sir Alexander Gibson. Chandos 8345, CD1, Tr 1-4. 33:14

Igor Stravinsky. Capriccio (1929). Geoffrey Tozer, piano, Orc hestre de la Suisse Romande, Neeme Jarvi. Chandos 9238, Tr 8-10. 16:59

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
4:50 pm
Sat January 7, 2012

The Musical World of Bela Bartok

The Hungarian Fine Arts Commission told Bartok in 1911 that his opera, the only one he would ever write, was no good, not suitable for the stage. With only two singers and no set changes, Bluebeard's Castle just wasn't operatic. He'd later tinker with it some, but the immediate effect of the rejection was that, for four years, he almost completely stopped writing music. Now recognized as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century, Bela Bartok--just entering the height of his powers--went into a composing blackout.

Program:

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
10:11 am
Sat December 3, 2011

Musical Jewels of Jean Sibelius

Gustav Mahler famously remarked that the symphony "must be like the world - it must embrace everything." This explains those disjunct themes delightfully butting against each other in his symphonies. What is often forgotten is that he said this to disagree with Jean Sibelius, who told Mahler that every part of a symphony must have a logical, ruthless interconnection with every other part. Not the world, replies Sibelius: a symphony is like the earth.

Program:

Jean Sibelius (1865-1957)

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