Crossover

Saturday, 11:30 am to 12:30 pm

Join Jill Pasternak every Saturday for her weekly interview show spotlighting notable music and musicians from the classical and jazz worlds - and the periphery as well!  Totally un-scripted and spontaneous, Crossover sounds like nothing else on the dial -- more like friends chatting over coffee than a broadcast interview.

Q & A with WRTI's Drivetime Diva: Jill Pasternak

Aug 31, 2015

[*This article originally appeared in the 2008 spring issue of TEMPO, WRTI's member magazine from 1997 to 2008.]

How long have you been at WRTI?
I started in September 1997 - so it’s been almost 10 years. My radio days began at WMHT in Schenectady, New York, and then I was at WFLN for 10 years and WQXR in New York City before moving over to WRTI. I’ve been on air for about 23 years.

Jill Pasternak's Path to WRTI

Aug 31, 2015

[*This article originally appeared in the 2000 spring issue of TEMPO, WRTI's member magazine from 1997 to 2008.]

Jill Pasternak is a celebrated Philadelphia radio personality whose work was recognized by Women in Communications when she won the Sarah Award in Radio Broadcasting in 1999. She is a denizen of the town that has truly loved her back, but when she arrived here 15 years ago, it was with apprehension. She says, "I thought that when I came to Philadelphia my life was over."

We have some bittersweet news here at WRTI. After more than 30 years on the radio, our longtime afternoon classical host Jill Pasternak has decided to retire as of September 1st to spend more time with her children and grandchildren.

This past May, pianist and conductor - and former music director of The Philadelphia Orchestra - Christoph Eschenbach was awarded the Ernst von Siemens prize for a lifetime in the service of music.

Just prior to receiving the prestigious and much-deserved accolade, Maestro Eschenbach turned 75, and decided that it was time to step down from his current post as music director of the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, DC.  He commented that after 30 years of directing orchestras, perhaps it was time for a break.

Tailor-made you may be asking?  Well, according to Strad Magazine, the Quartetto di Cremona is "...as sleek and elegant as an Armani suit.” And it's true. Every performer should have a tailor like that!

It's been said that when you hear the vocal group Anonymous 4 perform, you're listening to the music of angels or something that can't possibly come from our world. In a word, unearthly. Unfortunately, that sound won't be around much longer, as the group has decided to retire their angelic vocal cords with the 2015-2016 season.  

Returning guest, tenor Richard Troxell, can sing opera like no one's business.  Whether Rodolfo, Don Jose, Pinkerton, Romeo or Turiddu, he's a master.  Even at the ballpark singing the National Anthem, or just kidding around with Jimmy Fallon, his voice shines.  But jazz-pop?  

There's a whole world of music out there that, for the most part, goes in one ear and out the other. But if it weren't there, the world probably wouldn't sound as good. We're talking about "production music." Music used to create a mood or feeling without being the foreground element in a production.

The New York Times calls Alisa Weilerstein the "sovereign of the American cello," and continues, "it’s not technical brilliance that makes Alisa Weilerstein’s recording of Dvorak’s much-loved cello concerto special, though the young American cellist has it in spades. It’s the take-no-prisoners emotional investment that is evident in every bar, but never more so than in the heart-wrenching slow movement, where Ms. Weilerstein’s cello appears to take on human shape."

On this week's Crossover, we take to the stage to hear about the Philadelphia Theatre Company's new musical comedy, Murder for Two, running now through June 28 at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre in Center City, Philadelphia.

With book and music by Joe Kinosian, book and lyrics by Kellen Blair, and direction by Scott Schwartz, the hilarious whodunit features a two-man cast, with one actor investigating the crime and the other playing all the suspects – and both playing the piano.

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