Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

Composer ID: 
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The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI
11:24 am
Fri October 10, 2014

A Feast for Organ and Brass: The Philadelphians on WRTI, Oct. 12th, 1 PM

Conductor Alain Altinoglu

What a program! It's a re-broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI, Sunday, October 12th at 1 pm. The Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ and organist Michael Stairs are two of the biggest stars in a firmament of many! Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin had to withdraw from this performance in March, but it brought conductor Alain Altinoglu to Verizon Hall at Yannick’s recommendation, and was he ever in his element!

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San Francisco Opera on WRTI
1:46 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

The Chilling Opera, DOLORES CLAIBORNE, on WRTI: October 11, 1 PM

Soprano Patricia Racette sings Dolores, and bass-baritone Wayne Tigges sings Joe St. George.

The San Francisco Opera presents a world premiere! Desperate. Passionate. Trapped. Dolores Claiborne is willing to do whatever it takes to save herself and her daughter—even if that means taking a life. One of the most compelling characters to emerge from the imagination of Stephen King, the feisty Maine housekeeper is a natural fit for opera—and specifically for the dark theatricality of American composer Tobias Picker.

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Creatively Speaking
1:29 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

Fauré: A Requiem For A Healthy Young Man?

Gabriel Fauré composed his Requiem in D minor between 1887 and 1890

Gabriel Fauré began composing his Requiem in D minor at an unusual time - in his 30s, and nowhere near the end of his life. This setting of the Mass for the Dead for orchestra, chorus, and two soloists is famous for its central soprano aria Pie Jesu - also known as the "lullaby" requiem.

As WRTI’s Jim Cotter reports, the soprano Susanna Phillips says doing justice to this piece is a little like being in love. You'll hear Faure's Requiem, performed by The Philadelphia Orchestra on WRTI, Sunday October 12 at 1 pm.

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Creatively Speaking
12:08 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

The Famous Letter That Beethoven Wrote, about His Life and Art, at Age 31

Ludwig van Beethoven, overwhelmed with his loss of hearing, wrote a letter to his brothers in 1802 while resting in Heiligenstadt, Austria.

The Heiligenstadt Testament, a letter and directive written by Beethoven to his brothers in October, 1802, is an important missive, opened after the composer's death in 1827. It depicts his pain and struggle: the diminishing hope that his hearing will improve, a feeling of growing isolation, and his commitment to his art, that utlimately saves his life. By the time he wrote The Heiligenstadt Testament, the already-acclaimed composer had spent six years, starting at age 26 or 27, searching in vain for a “cure.”

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
5:44 pm
Mon October 6, 2014

A Ferguson Protest Brings New Meaning To Brahms' Requiem In St. Louis

Rebecca Rivas, a reporter for the St. Louis American newspaper, captured video of the Ferguson protest at the St. Louis Symphony concert Saturday night.
St. Louis American/YouTube

Originally published on Mon October 6, 2014 6:30 pm

At the St. Louis Symphony concert Saturday night, the intermission may have been the most memorable part of the performance. Demonstrators in the audience sang a "Requiem for Mike Brown," referencing the 18-year-old African-American shot to death by a Ferguson, Mo., police officer in August.

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Creatively Speaking
11:13 am
Mon October 6, 2014

Finding New Dimensions in Chamber Music

Dolce Suono's repertoire spans a range of works from Baroque to contemporary, for two to 11 musicians, with various combinations of instruments.

Chamber music, played by small ensembles, one player to a part, and without a conductor, is an intimate and engaging art form. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it can also provide insight into history and human emotions.  

For flutist and music historian Mimi Stillman, chamber music is a way to explore important issues "that illuminate how people thought at a given time."

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Creatively Speaking
10:44 am
Mon October 6, 2014

Violinist Tim Fain: Uniting Music Of The Cutting Edge With The Distant Past

Violinist Tim Fain

For all his hip Brooklyn looks, and up-to-the-minute repertoire, violinist Tim Fain is not adverse to traditional repertoire.

The Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns reports on a classical musician who doesn’t embrace the future by turning the page on the past.

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Opera on WRTI
4:45 pm
Thu October 2, 2014

San Francisco Opera on WRTI: Verdi's LA TRAVIATA, Oct. 4, 1 PM

Soprano Nicole Cabell sings Violetta and tenor Saimir Purgu sings Alfredo in San Francisco Opera's LA TRAVIATA
Cory Weaver

Violetta Valéry may be the most heart-wrenching character in all of opera: a high-spirited but deceptively delicate woman who unexpectedly finds, and then selflessly gives up, the love of her all-too-short life in Giuseppe Verdi's LA TRAVIATA. Saturday, October 4, 1 to 4 pm on WRTI.

Cast:

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
4:22 pm
Thu October 2, 2014

Bach Old and New

On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday, Oct. 4th, 5 to 6 pm. Every generation comes up with new ways to perform Johann Sebastian Bach. This tells us two things. One: Performance practice is as vital and relevant as ever. Rather than imagining forgotten professors paging through dusty tomes, we might envision performers kicking up dust with brilliant concerts of so-old-it’s-new repertoire.

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The Crossing Choir
4:02 pm
Thu October 2, 2014

The Crossing on WRTI: The Third 'Month of Moderns' Concert, Oct. 5, 3:30 PM

PRISM Quartet

Join us Sunday, October 5th at 3:30 pm for The Crossing chamber choir's third and final concert in their Sixth Annual Month of Moderns Festival, recorded live at The Icebox at Crane Arts Center in the Northern Liberties section of Philadelphia.

The Crossing is joined by the PRISM (Saxophone) Quartet in a world premiere by composer Gavin Bryars. Donald Nally conducts.

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