Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

Join us on Monday, January 16th at 1:30 pm for a LIVE broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute Concert at Girard College's historic chapel, honoring the life and legacy of Dr. King. Listen on WRTI 90.1 FM, stream the concert at WRTI.org, or listen on WRTI's mobile App! Gregg Whiteside is your host.

What Is a Fugue?

Jan 16, 2017

You don’t need to know anything about classical music to love it. But a deeper understanding of its rich history and context can add something special to your listening experience. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston takes us on this short flight of the fugue, which reached the height of its popularity in the Baroque period.

Credit: Jessica Griffin

Paul Jacobs, the only organist ever to have won a GRAMMY Award, will perform in all three works on our Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast this coming Sunday, January 15th at 1 pm.

Credit: Carliss Million

We have important and exciting news to share with you about the future of WRTI. Bill Johnson, WRTI station manager for the past 16 years, has been promoted to general manager of WRTI, responsible for the administration and supervision of all activities at the station.

Classical composers have long had their patrons: Beethoven had Archduke Rudolph, John Cage had Betty Freeman. For contemporary opera composers, there's Beth Morrison. She and her production company have commissioned new works from some of the most innovative emerging composers today.

Georges Prêtre, the French conductor with a seven-decade career that included close associations with Maria Callas and many of the world's top orchestras, died Wednesday in France at age 92.

Why Is Classical Music Called Classical Music?

Jan 4, 2017

Why do we call so much of the orchestral music we hear classical music? WRTI’s Susan Lewis suggests that  the masters of history’s classical period, from 1750 to the early 1800’s, may have branded the art form forever.


The four DePue brothers (Wallace, Jason, Zack, and Alex) were raised on classical music, barbershop, and Bluegrass. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, today they’re juggling work at conventional ensembles—with a family-based band specializing in a blend of classical and American grass roots music.

Theories abound about why the violins created in Cremona, Italy from the mid 1500s to the mid 1700s serve as the benchmark among masterpieces. Intriguing research by acoustics experts from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology might provide a clue.

Credit: Giorgia Bertazzi

On Sunday, January 8th at 1 pm, WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast brings us a feast of Ravel, and Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No. 1, played by the brilliant Curtis grad and rising star Benjamin Beilman! Listen on WRTI's new App!

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