Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

Among the hundreds of outdoor sculptures that dot Philadelphia’s urban landscape are three classical music masters. But they're not where you might expect to find them.

Credit Mathias Botho

Join us to hear the first concert in The Philadelphia Orchestra’s "Music of Vienna" series, recorded live last January at Verizon Hall. Pianist Jan Lisiecki, an audience favorite at only 20 years old, will be the soloist in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4.

Join us this Sunday, August 28th from 4 to 6 pm to hear The Crossing perform Jeff Quartets: a concert-length set of 15 new works for four voices. Recorded in a session on the eve of their world-premiere concert performance, these poignant new works were commissioned to honor the legacy of The Crossing’s co-founder, Jeffrey Dinsmore, who died tragically at the age of 42 in April, 2014.

WRTI's Mark Pinto fills us in on the latest classical music CDs on (most) Saturdays at 5 pm on Classical New Releases. Here are five newly released recordings he recommends. Take a look!

Mention the music of Vienna, and some of us automatically think of a waltz. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the city was a musical magnet for composers, especially from the late 18th century through the 19th and beyond.


Michael Patrick O’Leary

Violinist Hilary Hahn performs the fourth violin concerto of the Belgian composer and violinist Henri Vieuxtemps on The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast, Sunday, August 21st at 1 pm. This concerto is a favorite of Ms. Hahn’s; Vieuxtemps composed it while he was serving as violinist to Tsar Nicholas I in St. Petersburg.


Portrait by Thomas Hardy, 1791

Join us on Sunday from 5 to 6 pm as we present August’s concert broadcast by the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, opening with an archival recording made at the Walnut Street Theater, with the orchestra’s founder and then–music director Marc Mostovoy conducting. Current music director Dirk Brossé conducts the second half of the program, which was recorded at the Kimmel Center’s Perelman Theater in February, 2011.

DonkeyHotey

In the run-up to the November elections, political ads proliferate. WRTI’s Susan Lewis looks at how music contributes to the message.

The world is laughing at Florence Foster Jenkins once again in the new film of the same title. Meryl Streep plays the 1940s society matron who thought she was good enough to sing at Carnegie Hall, but was so sorely mistaken. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns, however, has stumbled onto the theory that Jenkins was laughing last.

It's difficult enough to start an orchestra, but Zuhal Sultan founded the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq (NYOI) as a teenager in the middle of a war. She brought together 40 young musicians from different Iraqi cities and sectarian backgrounds in an effort to unify a divided nation. Now, six years later, the Euphrates Institute has named her Visionary of the Year.

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