Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

Every great piece of music has a story behind it. Telling those stories and performing those works has become an all-consuming career and a popular concert format for pianist Jeffery Siegel.  WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Siegel's Keyboard Conversations.

There are very few tuba concertos in the classical repertoire - Ralph Vaughn Williams' 1954 work is among a handful. But, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, a new addition explores the largely untapped lyricism of the instrument.   

The votes are in...the WRTI audience has decided who should portray Lenny Bernstein in Martin Scorsese's  upcoming film. Thanks so much to everyone who voted! We had over 35 nominations, with some surprising opinions. What do you think of the results?

Critics and opera lovers alike think that this is the TOSCA to own. It's the Metropolitan Opera broadcast from April 7, 1962, and we're bringing it to you this Saturday, November 7 from 1 to 4 pm during WRTI's Annual Opera Day celebration. Check out Opera Day details here!

The all-star cast features Leontyne Price in the title role, in an electrifying performance of one of Puccini's most beloved operas. Kurt Adler conducts.

Four compositions, notable for their unusually imaginative explorations of distinctive sound worlds, are all featured on WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast this Sunday, November 8th at 1 pm.

Jeffrey Curnow has a serious funny bone. In his cartoons, he pokes fun at symphony orchestras, conductors and musicians from his perch as the associate principal trumpeter of the Philadelphia Orchestra.

Philadelphia has a new semi-resident choral group: Seraphic Fire, the Florida-based ensemble that is now expanding its seasons to New York and Washington DC as well. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns reports on this rare export from the Sunshine State.

Samuel Barber’s Adagio for Strings didn’t start out the way we know it now. WRTI’s Kile Smith looks at the inescapable strangeness of this work that is now one of the most heard and most moving pieces in the repertoire.

Twentieth-century Austrian composer Alban Berg dedicated his Violin Concerto to the memory of the 18-year-old daughter of a friend. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the work evokes emotion not typically associated with the 12-tone style.

The Smithsonian Institution

The national melody that's notoriously hard to sing, owes its musical roots to a private men's club. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston hears the "the bombs bursting in air" anew.