Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

Ludwig van Beethoven’s "Les Adieux" or "The Farewell" sonata (Piano Sonata No. 26) is considered the composer's most significant work from the period between 1809 - 1810. It was a time when the Napoleonic Wars continued to bring upheaval to Beethoven’s adopted city of Vienna, the surrounding region, and beyond.

Jessica Griffin

(Original broadcast, March, 2015) - The Philadelphia Orchestra has over 100 musicians, and as many stories - often inspiring and surprising.  WRTI’s Susan Lewis profiles Bob Cafaro, a cellist in the Orchestra since 1985, whose artistry is matched by his determination to live fully, both onstage and off.  

Tara McMullen

Be sure to join us Sunday, January 10th at 1 pm for our weekly Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast! Guest conductor Marin Alsop and pianist Jon Kimura Parker join the Philadelphians for George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. This is the original jazz band version, Ferde Grofe’s faithful orchestration of Paul Whiteman’s arrangement.

Some of the most talented young musicians in our region are members of the Philadelphia Youth Orchestra, now in its 76th season. Join us on Sunday, January 10th at 4 pm to hear The PYO's opening concert of the season, recorded at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall.

French composer and conductor Pierre Boulez was one of the most recognized figures in 20th century classical music. His outspoken advocacy for the music of his time earned him fans — and detractors. He died Tuesday at his home in Baden-Baden, Germany. He was 90 years old.

Just as the chaos of World War II was coming to an end, Pierre Boulez was emerging into his life as an artist.

Although 2015 produced arguably fewer big headlines in classical music than its predecessors, there were still surprising stories.

The question of assimilation has been on my mind a lot lately. Living in this great country where individuality is embraced, our current obsession with assimilation for those choosing the U.S. as their new home seems like a strange paradox.

In Memoriam 2015

Dec 30, 2015

Many musical voices fell silent in 2015. We lost soul singers and opera stars, blues and folk guitarists, saxophonists and percussionists, plus composers, conductors, producers, and other visionaries. Explore their musical legacies here.


Diane Charlemagne

Feb. 22, 1964 — Oct. 28, 2015

Violinist Christian Tetzlaff pays a return visit to Philadelphia for a performance of Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto on January 7th, 8th, and 9th with The Philadelphia Orchestra. We’ll look forward to the eminent violinist’s appearance at Verizon Hall with a rebroadcast of a delightful New Year’s program first heard on WRTI last January, when Mr. Tetzlaff performed Mozart’s sparkling Violin Concerto No. 5.

Theories abound about why the violins created in Cremona, Italy from the mid 1500s to the mid 1700s serve as the benchmark among masterpieces. Intriguing research by acoustics experts from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology might provide a clue.

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