Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) didn't play the flute, and once suggested he didn't even like it. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he went on to write music that makes the instrument sing...and dance!


After a poor performance by a sick tenor, a 19th-century opera based on Shakespeare’s Hamlet languished in an Italian archive for over 130 years. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, thanks to the curiosity and perseverance of a contemporary conductor, the work has new life. 


Composer Joseph Bertolozzi's latest musical project turned the Eiffel Tower into a giant percussion instrument. From the basement to the summit, the Paris monument's girders, railings, and rivets were banged, tapped, strummed and thumped. And then, those 10,000 samples were layered into one composition, called Tower Music.

This week’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast brings us a performance from early March, which saw the return to Philadelphia of pianist Hélène Grimaud, who performs a concerto close to her heart, the Brahms 2nd.

What's the latest at WRTI? Kevin Gordon is now your new companion during the Afternoon Drive show, every weekday from 2 to 6 pm. Tune in and get to know Kevin! We're very excited to welcome him to our staff.

Mat Hennek / DG

Unlocking the secrets in music is a joyful enterprise for pianist Helene Grimaud. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Grimaud’s approach to music and life. On Sunday, May 8th at 1 PM on WRTI, Helene Grimaud performs Brahms' Piano Concerto No. 2 with The Philadelphia Orchestra. 

This week, Passover is being celebrated by millions of the Jewish faith. And while the Christian holiday of Easter has inspired Bach's Saint Matthew Passion and many other beloved classical works, Passover claims no famous pieces in the concert repertoire. WRTI's Debra Lew Harder explores why.

Sharon Torello

Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia, founded in 1874, is a largely volunteer chorus of about 140 members.  As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, its new artistic director taps into the joy of singing to celebrate the past, present, and future of choral music.


Join us on Saturday afternoon after the The Metropolitan Opera broadcast of Richard Strauss' ELEKTRA (at approximately 3 pm) to hear the mega-talented resident artists of the Academy of Vocal Arts sing Puccini! You'll hear two of the one-act operas from Il Trittico - GIANNI SCHICCHI AND IL TABARRO (the cloak).

In 2011, the Philadelphia-based, South-Africa born singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Andrew Lipke released his fourth album, The Plague, with much fanfare, including a live interview and performance on WHYY's Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane, and lots of coverage on WXPN.  Fast forward to 2015, when he's approached by Matthew Glandorf, artistic director of Choral Arts Philadelphia, with an idea.

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