Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

It's not quite right to say the news came as a shock when the Metropolitan Opera announced Thursday that Yannick Nézet-Séguin would become the house's new music director, beginning in the 2020-21 season. He follows in the footsteps of James Levine, who said in April that he was stepping down after leading the Met for four decades.

Peter Richard Conte, host of WRTI’s Wanamaker Organ Hour, performs on and emcees the special Wanamaker Organ Day broadcast, this Saturday, June 4th, from 11 am to noon on WRTI.

After considerable speculation, the Metropolitan Opera announced today that Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin will become its next music director, replacing longtime director James Levine. The Philadelphia Orchestra simultaneously announced that Nézet-Séguin has extended his tenure with the orchestra to 10 years, through the 2025-2026 season. Because of Nézet-Séguin’s previous commitments, the Met appointment will not be fully phased in until the Met’s 2020-2021 season.

WRTI's Jack Moore will announce the winner of the Philadelphia Youth Orchestra's Third Annual Ovation Award at the Kimmel Center on June 5th at 3 pm. Ten music educators from the Delaware Valley have been nominated by their students, and will be honored for "inspiration and outstanding leadership in music education" during the PYO's Annual Festival Concert.

Hulton archive

After publicly resisting the growing fascism in Europe in the 1930s, Hungarian pianist and composer Bela Bartok eventually fled his homeland. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he wrote his Second Violin Concerto not long before emigrating to the United States.


Twentieth-century Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich composed much of his work under the shadow of political oppression. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, today, his music and his personal story continue to inspire a new generation.


Austrian composer Anton Webern became famous as a member of the "Second Viennese School," known for writing atonal music. But, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, an early work - officially premiered decades after Webern’s death - shows another side to the 20th-century modernist.


All three of the works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast were composed in Paris within a five-year period (1928-33), one by a German, another by a Frenchman, and the last by an American. And they all marvelously combine elements of serious composition with popular influences, notably from jazz.

Although you may not realize that it was first composed as a military march, you’ll instantly recognize one of Sir Edward Elgar’s most popular works, "Pomp and Circumstance, March No. 1 in D," - especially the nearly two-minute middle section so commonly associated with graduation. 

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