Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

Three richly orchestrated works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast complete the series of concerts from last January celebrating the music of Vienna.

Credit: Cheryl Mazak

WRTI’s Susan Lewis talked to Pinchas Zukerman and found that his career has been defined not only by the violin, the viola, and conducting, but also by one important element: his friends. 

Join us for a special broadcast from the Kimmel Center's 2016/2017 Open House!
 Gregg Whiteside will give us a behind-the-scenes look at the upcoming Kimmel season, broadcasting live from 10 am until the WRTI Saturday Opera starts at 1 pm, and talking with some of the people who make it all happen. And back at the station, Debra Lew Harder will bring you a delightful morning of the music you love.

Vienna was a hotbed of musical evolution, and the second concert in the Philadelphia Orchestra’s three-part series of the Music of Vienna shows us how far the symphony traveled in that time. On Sunday, September 4th at 1 pm, Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Philadelphians bring you two symphonies composed about 80 years apart: Joseph Haydn’s 103rd, the famous “Drumroll” Symphony, and Anton Bruckner’s 4th.

Interested in Steve Jobs, Georgia O'Keefe or Alice in Wonderland? They are all explored in new music in the upcoming American concert season.

The first stirrings of music, they say, often accompanied dancing, so on this last official holiday of the summer, let’s dance! Join us from noon Friday all the way through Monday night for WRTI’s Labor Day Weekend Dance Party!

Imagine you're a teenager in Beijing in the 1960s and '70s, during the Cultural Revolution. Everything that's deemed Western and bourgeois is banned — so listening to a 78 rpm recording of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, powerfully transformative as it might be, is off limits.

The symphony, as we know it today, underwent major changes from the end of the 18th to the late 19th century. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, two symphonies from two composers in Vienna during that time illustrate the range of the form.
 


Among the hundreds of outdoor sculptures that dot Philadelphia’s urban landscape are three classical music masters. But they're not where you might expect to find them.

Credit Mathias Botho

Join us to hear the first concert in The Philadelphia Orchestra’s "Music of Vienna" series, recorded live last January at Verizon Hall. Pianist Jan Lisiecki, an audience favorite at only 20 years old, will be the soloist in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4.

Pages