Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

Although Russian pianist, composer and conductor Sergei Rachmaninoff became an international star, his first symphony was considered a failure when it premiered in 1897, and was not performed again during the composer’s lifetime. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, today it’s regarded much differently. 

On Sunday, July 25th at 1 pm on WRTI, listen to a re-broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra performing Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 1 in 2014.

In the giddy, glitzy world of the Roaring Twenties, a naive young man falls head over heels for a glamorous party girl. Together they trade the fast life for an idyllic love nest far from the city…until an unexpected visitor threatens to tear them apart. It's one of opera’s greatest romances, La Traviata on WRTI, July 18, 1 to 3:30 pm. James Conlon conducts.

Nino Machaidze sings Violetta, with Arturo Chacón-Cruz as her handsome Alfredo. The incomparable Plácido Domingo sings the role of the father determined to do the right thing.

Amateur Musicians Go Pro With The Baltimore Symphony

Jul 18, 2015

What would it sound like if you put a bunch of amateur musicians onstage with a professional orchestra and told them to play? Probably a bit like a rehearsal at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall in Baltimore last month.

Seventy years ago, shortly after defeating Nazi Germany, three victorious leaders met in Potsdam, just outside Berlin. President Harry Truman was there with British and Soviet leaders Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin. Stuart Canin was also there — he was a 19-year-old GI from New York City who played the violin.

The Orchestra's 115th season began last September with the initiation of the 40/40 Project, a broadening of the ensemble’s repertoire that featured 40 works not performed on subscription concerts in at least the last 40 years (or ever), in honor of Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s 40th birthday. Philadelphia audiences were asked to vote through electronic and social media, and three favorites were chosen to open the three respective concerts at the end of September.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's hard for me to believe a voice like this could ever go silent.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ESULTALTE")

JON VICKERS: (Singing in foreign language).

The Faure Requiem – with full orchestra, choir, and soloists - premiered on July 12, 1900. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it was not a typical requiem, nor was it the first incarnation of the work. 

Radio script:

Susan Lewis: The Faure Requiem, known to us today, had its first performance at a World’s Fair, the Paris Exposition of 1900. Also, its not the original version.

Richard Strauss’ Alpine Symphony is, on one level, a musical description of nature. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the accessible music belies a greater meaning.

Based on a boyhood experience getting caught in a storm hiking in the Alps, the idea for An Alpine Symphony germinated for years in Strauss’s mind.  It wasn’t until after Gustav Mahler died, that he determined to finish the work, which he regarded as a tribute to his fellow composer.

Join us for an intense performance by Lisa Batiashvili of Shostakovich's Violin Concerto No. 1 with The Philadelphia Orchestra under Yannick Nezet-Seguin. This was the centerpiece of the last concert of the 2014/2015 season and a program the Orchestra took on its European tour, which was a stunning success.

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