Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

Credit: Lisa-Marie Mazzucco

You go to a concert and see a string quartet looking like most every other string quartet — until it dawns on you they’re not looking at music. WRTI’s Susan Lewis talks to the Chiara String Quartet, who plays all the Bartók string quartets, and more, from memory.

This year marks the 150th anniversary of Erik Satie, the eccentric French composer at the intersection of modernism and minimalism in early 20th-century music and art. From Monday, October 17th through Friday the 21st, WRTI will revisit his enigmatically beautiful music all week long.

Credit: Richard Holt

WRTI remembers Sir Neville Marriner with an entire Saturday morning of his recordings, October 15th, 6 am to noon. The prolific and revered conductor passed away October 2nd in London at age 92.

All three of the works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast were composed in Paris within a five-year period (1928-33), one by a German, another by a Frenchman, and the last by an American. And they all marvelously combine elements of serious composition with popular influences, notably from jazz.

A concert piece for cello and orchestra uses sacred music from the center of Jewish tradition. Max Bruch's Kol Nidre is a work with wide appeal from an unlikely composer.

At what’s likely to be a frosty noon-time ceremony this January, one presidential candidate will be announced with a well-known march preceded by the ultimate in U.S. fanfare: not one, but four sets of drum ruffles and bugle flourishes.

Brian Eno. David Bowie. Kraftwerk. Radiohead. Aphex Twin. The National. These are just some of the contemporary artists and bands who have looked up to American composer Steve Reich.

Piffaro, Philadelphia’s Renaissance band, is taking Don Quixote back to his 17th-century roots in a pair of concerts this weekend at the Episcopal Cathedral titled The Musical World of Don Quixote. What might those roots sound like? A lot like ours, says the Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns. 

It's not often that one harpsichord is heard in concert with orchestra, let alone two! WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on C.P.E. Bach’s Concerto for Two Harpsichords in F major, and two soloists who champion it.

We wish a happy and healthy new year to everyone observing the Jewish High Holidays! Join us for a meaningful and joyous celebration on WRTI, Sunday, Oct. 9th, from 4 to 6 pm, with two special programs.