Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

Composer ID: 
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Philadelphia Music Makers, March 29, 5 PM
1:28 pm
Tue March 24, 2015

Composer Jennifer Higdon Tells Her Story: Part 2

Jennifer Higdon and her cat, Beau
Candace diCarlo

The door closed behind Jennifer Higdon. She was in the office of her college conducting professor, Robert Spano, seeking advice about what to do. She had just heard back from the Curtis Institute of Music - they had accepted her application for graduate studies, but so had other music schools. She needed guidance.  "I'm not letting you out of here," Spano said, until she agreed to accept the spot from Curtis.

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WRTI Arts Desk
2:06 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

A Piano Concerto For Maxim

Shostakovich wrote his Piano Concerto No. 2 for his teenage son, Maxim, who premiered it at his graduation from the Moscow Conservatory in May, 1957.

Dmitri Shostakovich, known for many dramatic works composed in the shadow of Stalin, showed a different side - one filled with humor and family ties - in his Piano Concerto No. 2.

Listen to WRTI on Sunday, March 29, 2015 at 1 pm as Kirill Gerstein performs Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto No. 2 with The Philadelphia Orchestra.

Radio Script:

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Creatively Speaking
10:39 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Tan Dun: Building on Bela Bartok's Legacy

Chinese contemporary classical composer and conductor, Tan Dun

Hungarian pianist and composer Bela Bartok was born on March 25th in the year 1881. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he is revered by a prominent contemporary composer who is building on Bartok’s legacy.

Tan Dun's Nu Shu: The Secret Songs of Women was premiered in the U.S. by The Philadelphia Orchestra this season, and broadcast on WRTI in December, 2013.

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Creatively Speaking
10:33 am
Mon March 23, 2015

The Musical Treasure Trove At The Library Of Congress

Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990) at work in his apartment in NYC in 1947.
Photographic proof by Victor Kraft Library of Congress

A manuscript of a J.S. Bach cantata casts a new light on how Bach intended the piece to be played. A singer gains insight from a line in a Porgy and Bess manuscript that differs from the final lyrics. The Music Division of the massive Library of Congress in Washington, DC,  is a place where performers, composers, scholars and the general public make discoveries of the musical kind.

Case in point: in a series of letters written in 1957 to his wife Felicia, while she was visiting her family in Santiago, Chile, Leonard Bernstein faithfully chronicles the progress of West Side Story during the final weeks of rehearsal through the show’s out-of-town opening in Washington, D.C.  The letters reveal Bernstein’s changing emotions about the show from frustration and agony to his final state of euphoria.  In addition to comments about West Side Story, Bernstein writes about signing his contract as conductor with the New York Philharmonic, his upcoming thirty-ninth birthday, and how much he misses Felicia and their children, Jamie and Alexander. Read the letters here.

The Special Collections of the Music Division are truly fascinating and constitute a resource for musical scholarship that is unmatched anywhere in the world. These unique bodies of materials are extraordinarily vast and diverse, yet very much interrelated. They include some of the greatest treasures of the Music Division and the Library of Congress.

WRTI Picks from NPR Music
2:30 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

'Seymour': A Loving Portrait Of An Acclaimed Classical Pianist

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 2:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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Philadelphia Music Makers, March 22 at 5 PM
10:37 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Composer Jennifer Higdon Tells Her Story: Part 1

Jennifer Higdon and her cat, Beau
Candace diCarlo

“Kind of incredible, isn’t it?” says Jennifer Higdon. She has won a Pulitzer and a Grammy, her orchestral work blue cathedral has been performed more than 500 times, she is professor of composition at the Curtis Institute of Music, and is one of the world’s most-performed living classical composers. But when she arrived at college, she hadn’t heard of Igor Stravinsky. “I knew nothing,” she said.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
12:11 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Sviatoslav Richter: The Pianist Who Made The Earth Move

Sviatoslav Richter, born 100 years ago in Ukraine, is considered one of the world's greatest pianists.
Sony Music Photo Archives

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 8:48 am

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The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI
3:07 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

LIVE! The Philadelphia Orchestra on WRTI: Holst, Mendelssohn, Salerno-Sonnenberg, March 22, 2 PM

Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg

Join us for a very special treat on Sunday, March 22nd as our Philadelphia Orchestra broadcast comes to you LIVE from Verizon Hall at 2 pm - an hour later than usual - in a concert featuring violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, a Philadelphia favorite since she debuted with the Orchestra at the age of 10.

She joins conductor Gianandrea Noseda for a performance of Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto, one of the most popular works in the violin repertory.

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WRTI Arts Desk
12:39 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Mozart In The Market: The Philadelphia Orchestra Pops Up At Reading Terminal

Moses Smucker, from the Reading Terminal Market's Smucker's Quality Meats & Grill, stepped out to conduct Mozart.
Pete Checchia

You never know where you're going to run into The Philadelphia Orchestra. An earthquake zone in China? Tokyo's Suntory Hall? Last week, as The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns reports, it was the Reading Terminal Market, where 11 string players crowded into the lunchtime bustle and invited everyday people to try their hand at conducting.

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WRTI Arts Desk
10:55 am
Tue March 17, 2015

That Contagious Bach Bug! Do You Have It?

J.S. Bach would turn 320 years old this month. And contemporary musicians continue to mine riches from his music. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, award-winning violinist Gil Shaham finds Bach connections in everything he plays.

Radio script:

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