Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

The Yellow River Piano Concerto, performed by The Philadelphia Orchestra during its historic trip to China in 1973, has become a part of the Western symphonic repertoire since its premiere in 1969 during China's Cultural Revolution. What is less well known in this country is the story of the cantata that led to the concerto.

On September 22nd, the most well-known song in the English language was freed for use by all. Commercial enterprises will no longer be required to pay licensing fees or risk fines for violating the copyright claim of music publisher Warner/Chappell.  As of this writing, it’s unknown if Warner will continue to fight the case filed two years ago. Stay tuned.

Symphony in C’s new music director grew up in Bulgaria, studied in Paris, and has lived on both coasts of the U.S. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he brings enthusiasm and a wealth of experience learning from some of today’s most masterful conductors.

Listen to a broadcast of Stilian Kirov leading Symphony in C on WRTI: Sunday October 4th at 3 pm, in a program featuring music by Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky, as well as a new work by Patrick O’Malley, the 2015 Winner of the Symphony’s Young Composers' Competition. Alexander Kobrin, pianist.

Yannick Nezet-Seguin conducts works by Haydn, Beethoven, and Vaughan Williams on this Sunday's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast - a live concert recording from March, 2015 at Verizon Hall.

You'll hear one of Haydn’s most ambitious essays, the Symphony No. 92, known as the “Oxford” because he conducted a performance at the illustrious University in July 1791, when he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Music.

Francis in Philadelphia: The Sacred Roots of Classical Music

Sep 24, 2015

The Philadelphia Orchestra's Blog recently revealed the repertoire for the Papal Mass, which will be celebrated on Philadelphia's Benjamin Franklin Parkway on September 27, 2015. This post appeared originally on The Philadelphia Orchestra’s blog and is part of a series on the Pope. The series can be found here.

First there was the audition. Then there was the waiting. Tryouts for the Papal Choir took place in July, and rehearsals began in early August. Each church was invited to send four of its best singers. Lynn Pupek, a first soprano, and Michele Sinnott, a second soprano, are sisters from different parishes who made it into the choir. They share a sense of participating in history.

A concert piece for cello and orchestra uses sacred music from the center of Jewish tradition. Consider Kol Nidre of Max Bruch, a work with wide appeal from an unlikely composer.

At the center of the Jewish year are the High Holy Days, culminating in Yom Kippur. Leading to this Day of Atonement is Kol Nidre, which is a service and a prayer. All vows, all words spoken against righteousness, are repented.

This Sunday, September 27 from 4 to 6 pm, join us for the third and final concert in The Crossing chamber choir's Seventh Annual Month of Moderns (MoM) Festival, recorded live on Saturday, June 27, 2015 at The Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill
. Listen at WRTI 90.1 FM or one of our other frequencies in PA, NJ, and DE, or online at

Clapping, snapping, and tapping one’s body can teach rhythm and enliven a musical performance. And, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, body percussion is also being used to make people feel better.