Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

WRTI Is More Than Music…It’s a Partnership

Sep 20, 2017

We're in our Fall Member Drive, and we're celebrating YOU and the amazing things made possible on WRTI and in our community because of our partnership with you.

The High Holidays of Rosh Hashanah (the Jewish New Year) and Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement) are among the most sacred days of the year for Jews around the world. Join us on Saturday from 4 to 6 pm for two special programs featuring music for the high holidays.

When it's time to celebrate, no music expresses the joy of life like klezmer. WRTI's Debra Lew Harder takes us into klezmer's rich world and heritage. A Happy and Healthy New Year to all of our listeners celebrating the Jewish High Holidays!

Johannes Brahms' last work was composed for an instrument he’d not written for in decades, in a style that harkened back to J.S. Bach. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Brahms' chorale preludes for organ.

Credit: Chris Lee

Join us to hear conclusion of The Philadelphia Orchestra's chronological survey of Brahms’ magisterial four symphonies from last spring with a performance of his Symphony No. 4, on WRTI’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast from 1 to 3 pm on Sunday, September 24th.

It was in 1832 that the great virtuoso violinist Niccolò Paganini—also an extraordinary violist—became the proud new owner of a Stradivarius viola. Wanting to show it off, but frustrated by the lack of concertos featuring the instrument, he commissioned Hector Berlioz to write a work that would help him put his purchase on display.

Jessica Griffin

Early solo viola repertoire was often played by violinists who also played the viola. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, that music today puts violists in the spotlight, including Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Violist Choong-Jin (C.J.) Chang.

Credit: Elias

Week Two of the Philadelphia Orchestra’s Paris Festival on WRTI 90.1 offers a different aspect to a program featuring music-making in the City of Light: non-French composers who moved to Paris, and decided to stay.

The documentary film The Music of Strangers, and a companion CD, Sing Me Home—from Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble— both snared 2017 Grammy nominations, and a Grammy win for the CD for Best World Music Album. WRTI's Susan Lewis has the story on the Silk Road Ensemble, a group that seeks connections across cultures.
 


Todd Rosenberg for the Kennedy Center

What does it take to write an opera about a man who changed the world? It takes a composer like Mason Bates, known as a master of computer-generated music who integrates the sounds of technology with the beauty of acoustic instruments.

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