Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Credit: By Anonymous, possibly by Pietro Antonio Lorenzoni (1721-1782) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast this Sunday, February 26, from 1 to 3 pm, celebrates Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart—the prodigy, and the master, with performances of his First Symphony, written at age eight, and his final one, the 41st Symphony​, composed a quarter century later.

This Sunday at 1 pm, it’s a memorable re-broadcast from 2014 of the fast-paced, one-act opera Salome. Among the most important musical works of the 20th century, it stands out for its revolutionary use of a large-scale orchestra and virtuosic singers, as much as for its graphic depiction of this deeply psychological tale. It's performed in a historic, joint production by the Philadelphia Orchestra and Opera Philadelphia.

Grammy Week on WRTI

Feb 16, 2017

The 2017 Grammys were awarded on Sunday, February 12th, and all week long WRTI plays the nominees and winners! You’ll get to hear the music, the performers, and the composers nominated in the many Classical and Jazz fields.

The third Sunday of the month on WRTI at 5 pm is our broadcast of the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, and this month we present a delightful mix of pieces from three different concerts.

Everyone’s telling us how much they loved our list of Essential Classical Composers and Jazz Artists! Well, almost everyone. You have strong opinions about who made the top 13—and who didn’t.

When it's time to celebrate, no music expresses the joy of life like klezmer. WRTI's Debra Lew Harder takes us into klezmer's rich world and heritage. This Sunday, February 19 at 8 pm, you can hear the Philadelphia Klezmer Heritage Ensemble, directed by Hankus Netsky, at Temple Beth Sholom in Elkins Park.

Classical composer Michael Daugherty, who won two 2017 Grammy Awards, writes music about ideas, people, and places from popular culture. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, his works invite listeners to engage with the music through their own experiences.


Born in New York City to Jewish-German immigrants, Lorenz Hart penned some of Broadway’s most haunting, sophisticated lyrics. He began collaborating with composer Richard Rodgers when he was 24 and Rodgers 17.

The documentary film The Music of Strangers, and a companion CD, Sing Me Home—from Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble— both snared Grammy nominations, and a Grammy win for the CD for Best World Music Album. WRTI's Susan Lewis has the story on the Silk Road Ensemble, a group that seeks connections across cultures.
 


This year’s One Book, One Philadelphia features the novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, by Mark Haddon. There’s a musical analog to this imaginative tale; Curtis Institute of Music Post-Bacc composition student and Rhodes Scholar Nick DiBerardino read the book and conjured a piece for percussion. His composition "Homunculus" premiered on January 25th at the Free Library of Philadelphia's Parkway Central Library.

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