Classical Weekdays

Monday through Friday, 6 am to 6 pm

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are below.

Composer ID: 
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AVA Opera on WRTI
6:18 am
Sun May 3, 2015

Academy of Vocal Arts on WRTI: Gounod's FAUST, May 3rd at 3 PM

Mexican tenor Diego Silva sings the title role

Join us for another broadcast in our series of operas from the Academy of Vocal Arts.  AVA Opera Theater is currently presenting Charles Gounod’s Faust, in a series of performances throughout the Delaware Valley. Additional performances are scheduled for Centennial Hall at the Haverford School, Haverford on May 5th, and Central Bucks East High School, Doylestown on May 9th. Listen on WRTI this Sunday, May 3, from 3 to 6 pm.

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The Philadelphia Youth Orchestra on WRTI
2:09 pm
Fri May 1, 2015

The Philadelphia Youth Orchestra on WRTI: Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, & Shostakovich, May 10 at 3 PM

The Philadelphia Youth Orchestra performing at Verizon Hall in February, 2015.

The acclaimed Philadelphia Youth Orchestra, under Music Director Louis Scaglione, returns to WRTI with a Mother's Day concert broadcast. The program, recorded at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall this past February, opens with a performance of Shotsakovich's lively Festive Overture. Then, Philadelphia Orchestra violinist Richard Amoroso plays the Beethoven Violin Concerto. The closing work on the program is a Tchaikovsky favorite, the Symphony No. 5 in E minor.  

Jack Moore is your host on Sunday, May 10 at 3 pm on WRTI.

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The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI
4:38 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI: Sarah Chang Plays Dvorak in 2004, May 3rd, 1 PM

Violinist Sarah Chang
Colin Bell

It’s always a special occasion when Philadelphia native Sarah Chang appears with The Philadelphia Orchestra. And she’ll be here on May 7, 8 and 9 for performances of Antonin Dvorak’s Violin Concerto, conducted by the Philadelphia Orchestra's Conductor-in-Residence Cristian Macelaru.

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WRTI Arts Desk
3:30 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Bass-Baritone Eric Owens: Not Taking Anything For Granted

Bass-baritone Eric Owens

 

Eric Owens has come a long way from Philadelphia's Central High School. This once-fledging oboe player has evolved into a bass-baritone who has opera productions built around him. One is Opera Philadelphia's current Don Carlo, where he's singing the role of lonely, powerful King Philip, but took time to share trade secrets with The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
3:08 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

How The Met Opera's Chorus Master Gets 150 To Sound Like One

Donald Palumbo became the Met's chorus master in the 2007-2008 season. He sang in choruses all his life, he says, and eventually worked his way up without any formal conservatory training.
Marty Sohl Courtesy of the Met

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 11:05 am

Metropolitan Opera Chorus Master Donald Palumbo knows voices, and how to instruct singers to protect them.

Palumbo says that all singers have to monitor their voices while rehearsing during the day. The goal, he says, is to insure singers are at their "freshest" and "most solid" for the evening performance.

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WRTI Arts Desk
6:30 am
Mon April 27, 2015

A New World Was Needed to Create This Symphony

A native of Bohemia, Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904) was a minority in the Austrian Empire and in the classical music world. But he had risen to the top of it all when a millionaire patroness hired him to direct the brand-new National Conservatory of Music of America in New York City. It would train all students without regard to race or ability to pay. There, in 1893, Dvořák’s eyes were opened to the possibilities of an "American" music.

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The Chamber Orchestra of Philadlephia on WRTI
8:02 am
Sun April 26, 2015

Mozart and Verdi with The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia on WRTI, April 26 at 4 PM

Pianist Sean Chen won Third Prize at the 14th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, becoming the first American to reach the finals since 1997.

Mozart and Verdi make up the program for this month's Applause! broadcast on WRTI from the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia. Guest conductor Nir Kabaretti led the concert in the Perelman Theater at the Kimmel Center this past March. The internationally acclaimed conductor is music director of the South West Florida Symphony and continues his tenure as music and artistic director of the Santa Barbara Symphony.

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The Metropolitan Opera on WRTI
9:55 am
Sat April 25, 2015

The Met Opera on WRTI: The Enduringly Popular "CAV" and "PAG," April 25, 1 PM

Soprano Patricia Racette as Nedda with Marty Keiser, Joshua Wynter, and Andy Sapora in Leoncavallo's "Pagliacci."

Join us for The Metropolitan Opera's live broadcast of opera’s most enduring, tragic double bill. Marcelo Álvarez rises to the challenge of playing the dual tenor roles of Turiddu in Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana and Canio in Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci. Eva-Maria Westbroek (Cav) and Patricia Racette (Pag) are the unlucky heroines, and George Gagnidze sings both Alfio and Tonio.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
7:59 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Roomful Of Teeth: A Vocal Group That's 'A Band, Not A Choir'

Roomful of Teeth's new album is Render, out April 28.
Bonica Ayala Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 2:16 pm

The vocal ensemble Roomful of Teeth consists of eight classically trained singers incorporating Tuvan throat singing, Appalachian yodeling, operatic trills, rhythmic exhalations and whispered speech into music written by some of the most exciting young composers of the 21st century.

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Listen on Sunday, April 26 at 5 PM
12:03 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Charles Abramovic Keeps Surprising

His own piano teacher told him he wouldn’t get into Curtis, but that he ought to audition anyway, for the experience. So, two weeks after traveling from Pittsburgh with his mother to play for Rudolf Serkin and Eleanor Sokoloff, Charles Abramovic received a letter from the Curtis Institute of Music. He was accepted.

Abramovic has been surprising people his whole life, and it’s easy to see why. His family had almost no interest in music of any kind, let alone classical, although he does remember a Dave Brubeck record in the house. What did he like most about the LP? The bass player.

He did begin piano lessons at age six after his kindergarten teacher noted that he reacted to music “differently” from the other kids, and four years later was playing in the Pittsburgh Youth Symphony Orchestra. Playing double bass, that is, although he would take on symphonic piano parts, too.

By this time he was studying piano with Natalie Phillips, whose husband Eugene was a violist and violinist in the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra as well as composer, and whose sons Daniel and Todd would one day be renowned violinists in the Orion String Quartet. Abramovic remembers private lessons morphing into coaching and chamber music soirées with the Phillips family. Before long he was playing the Rachmaninoff Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini on a Pittsburgh Symphony Young People’s Concert. It was clear that music was calling him.

Or maybe it was psychoanalysis. His “light reading” in eighth grade, he confesses, was The Interpretation of Dreams by Sigmund Freud. But Abramovic decided against that as a profession and went with music, although he later discovered that a large part of private teaching is helping students of all personality types and backgrounds. He wonders if it may have produced another benefit, as he did marry the daughter of a psychoanalyst, the cellist, conductor, and composer Heidi Jacob.

After Curtis (where he also played double bass in their orchestra) and Peabody, he earned his DMA at Temple University, with the music of Croatia as his research topic. The Abramović (pronounced Abramovich) family is from that area, and the music fascinates him.

Abramovic as pianist with Mimi Stillman’s Dolce Suono, here playing Astor Piazzolla’s Libertango:

He loves, and plays, the standard piano repertoire, but Abramovic likes to take surprising paths. A favorite is Charles Ives. He’s performed the monumental Concord Sonata (which hardly anyone will attempt), but knows the entire Ives catalog, which has inspired another surprise: Charles Abramovic, composer. His piece Unanswered Hands, for three pianists—piano six-hands, that is—throws in “as many musical memories from childhood” as he could fit. In the same way that Ives uses hymns, marches, and everything else in a piece like The Unanswered Question, Abramovic “out-quotes Ives,” he claims, in a work filled with nostalgia and humor.

He has been a professor at Temple since 1990, and enjoys a career in Philadelphia and beyond as a sought-after soloist, accompanist, chamber musician, and recording artist. One of the most affable and humorous of musicians, he nevertheless cannot hide a ferocious talent that has left not a few shaking their heads over the ease with which he negotiates the most blistering piano writing.

Whether it’s Ives, Babbitt, tango, jazz, rags, new music, his own music, or simply making the impossible look easy, Charles Abramovic is ever full of surprises.

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