Classical Through the Night

Monday though Saturday, 10 pm to 6 am; Sunday, 11 pm to 6 am on HD-2 and the Classical Stream
Peter Van de Graaf, heard on HD-2 and the classical stream

Host Peter Van de Graaff draws music selections from all eras, but focuses on works from the Baroque, Classical, and Romantic eras. While focusing on the standards of the repertoire, the show goes beyond that and draws from the rich and varied music that comprises all of what we call "classical music," shared in an interesting manner. 

Composer ID: 
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Now Is the Time
9:53 am
Sat May 23, 2015

Streetscape

It's all spontaneous fun this weekend on Now Is the Time, Saturday, May 23rd at 9 pm. Paavo Järvi conducts a substantial orchestral work by Charles Coleman, Streetscape, then Patrick Beckman plays his own Funky, from his all-piano CD Street Dance. On the CD Dream Streets violinist/composer Cornelius Duffalo performs with an imaginative use of electronics; we'll hear introduction and cosmic clouds.

From a piano concerto whose movements are all in the key of D, Stefania de Kenessey has assembled a solo piano work Spontaneous D-Combustion. Charles Coleman returns with another Järvi, Kristjan, conducting his Absolute Ensemble in Young Worlds.

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The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI
6:16 am
Fri May 8, 2015

The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI: Benjamin Beilman, Higdon & Debussy, May 10, 1 PM

Violinist Benjamin Beilman

Join us this Sunday, May 10th, for WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast, which pairs the music of Philadelphia’s own Jennifer Higdon, one of today’s leading composers, with one of her personal favorites: Claude Debussy.

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The Metropolitan Opera on WRTI
4:27 am
Thu May 7, 2015

James Levine Leads a Rare Met Opera Revival of Stravinsky's THE RAKE'S PROGRESS: May 9, 1 PM on WRTI

Paul Appleby as Tom Rakewell and Layla Claire as Anne Trulove in Stravinksky's THE RAKE'S PROGRESS.
Marty Sohl

The 2014-15 Metropolitan Opera Radio Broadcast season concludes with a broadcast of a 20th-century masterpiece, Igor Stravinsky’s only full-length opera, The Rake’s Progress.

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The Philadelphia Youth Orchestra on WRTI
2:09 pm
Fri May 1, 2015

The Philadelphia Youth Orchestra on WRTI: Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, & Shostakovich, May 10 at 3 PM

The Philadelphia Youth Orchestra performing at Verizon Hall in February, 2015.

The acclaimed Philadelphia Youth Orchestra, under Music Director Louis Scaglione, returns to WRTI with a Mother's Day concert broadcast. The program, recorded at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall this past February, opens with a performance of Shotsakovich's lively Festive Overture. Then, Philadelphia Orchestra violinist and PYO alumnus Richard Amoroso plays the Beethoven Violin Concerto. The closing work on the program is a Tchaikovsky favorite, the Symphony No. 5 in E minor.  

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Now Is the Time
12:43 pm
Fri May 1, 2015

Unseen Sounds

We can almost see the music on Now Is the Time, Saturday, May 2nd at 9 pm. Robert Moran took snippets of words from a 30-year correspondence with John Cage and worked them into this delicious three-part work for chorus, Seven Sounds Unseen.

Nicolas Scherzinger spins musical motifs within a chamber ensemble and imagines what they would sound like if held up to Fractured Mirrors. The particular sand of the Gobi Desert, they say, sings when the wind blows a certain way. Bright Sheng conducts two ensembles in The Singing Gobi Desert, Music from China and the Prism Saxophone Quartet, with whom he imagines hearing the sand and viewing a mirage—the archetype of seeing and not-seeing.

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WRTI Arts Desk
6:30 am
Mon April 27, 2015

A New World Was Needed to Create This Symphony

A native of Bohemia, Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904) was a minority in the Austrian Empire and in the classical music world. But he had risen to the top of it all when a millionaire patroness hired him to direct the brand-new National Conservatory of Music of America in New York City. It would train all students without regard to race or ability to pay. There, in 1893, Dvořák’s eyes were opened to the possibilities of an "American" music.

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Now Is the Time
8:03 pm
Sat April 25, 2015

Tango Nuevo

from the CD Entangoed, Eliane Lust, piano

The tango spins and snaps to a halt on Now Is the Time, Saturday, April 25th at 9 pm. If there’s a meaning behind Mean Old Pony Tango by Michael Kurth, we’ll let it go by to revel in the string quartet antics, and Adrienne Albert combines rock energy with the smooth ride of L.A. Tango Nuevo. A solo piano is overcome with romance in Robert Elkjer’s En-tango-ed, and James Adler gnarls a Twisted Tango with his own self at the piano, accompanying saxophone.

Ingrid Arauco’s Divertimento for an unusual trio includes a tango among its movements. Kenneth Froelich has no obvious tango in Clockwork Automata, but do we detect its spirit among the spinning and clicking? Finally, a string quartet returns to play Tanguori by Jeremy Cohen, snapping the program to a close.

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Listen on Sunday, April 26 at 5 PM
12:03 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Charles Abramovic Keeps Surprising

His own piano teacher told him he wouldn’t get into Curtis, but that he ought to audition anyway, for the experience. So, two weeks after traveling from Pittsburgh with his mother to play for Rudolf Serkin and Eleanor Sokoloff, Charles Abramovic received a letter from the Curtis Institute of Music. He was accepted.

Abramovic has been surprising people his whole life, and it’s easy to see why. His family had almost no interest in music of any kind, let alone classical, although he does remember a Dave Brubeck record in the house. What did he like most about the LP? The bass player.

He did begin piano lessons at age six after his kindergarten teacher noted that he reacted to music “differently” from the other kids, and four years later was playing in the Pittsburgh Youth Symphony Orchestra. Playing double bass, that is, although he would take on symphonic piano parts, too.

By this time he was studying piano with Natalie Phillips, whose husband Eugene was a violist and violinist in the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra as well as composer, and whose sons Daniel and Todd would one day be renowned violinists in the Orion String Quartet. Abramovic remembers private lessons morphing into coaching and chamber music soirées with the Phillips family. Before long he was playing the Rachmaninoff Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini on a Pittsburgh Symphony Young People’s Concert. It was clear that music was calling him.

Or maybe it was psychoanalysis. His “light reading” in eighth grade, he confesses, was The Interpretation of Dreams by Sigmund Freud. But Abramovic decided against that as a profession and went with music, although he later discovered that a large part of private teaching is helping students of all personality types and backgrounds. He wonders if it may have produced another benefit, as he did marry the daughter of a psychoanalyst, the cellist, conductor, and composer Heidi Jacob.

After Curtis (where he also played double bass in their orchestra) and Peabody, he earned his DMA at Temple University, with the music of Croatia as his research topic. The Abramović (pronounced Abramovich) family is from that area, and the music fascinates him.

Abramovic as pianist with Mimi Stillman’s Dolce Suono, here playing Astor Piazzolla’s Libertango:

He loves, and plays, the standard piano repertoire, but Abramovic likes to take surprising paths. A favorite is Charles Ives. He’s performed the monumental Concord Sonata (which hardly anyone will attempt), but knows the entire Ives catalog, which has inspired another surprise: Charles Abramovic, composer. His piece Unanswered Hands, for three pianists—piano six-hands, that is—throws in “as many musical memories from childhood” as he could fit. In the same way that Ives uses hymns, marches, and everything else in a piece like The Unanswered Question, Abramovic “out-quotes Ives,” he claims, in a work filled with nostalgia and humor.

He has been a professor at Temple since 1990, and enjoys a career in Philadelphia and beyond as a sought-after soloist, accompanist, chamber musician, and recording artist. One of the most affable and humorous of musicians, he nevertheless cannot hide a ferocious talent that has left not a few shaking their heads over the ease with which he negotiates the most blistering piano writing.

Whether it’s Ives, Babbitt, tango, jazz, rags, new music, his own music, or simply making the impossible look easy, Charles Abramovic is ever full of surprises.

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WRTI Arts Desk
11:07 am
Mon April 20, 2015

Listen To This: The Dreamiest Chopin You've Ever Heard

Pianist Chad Lawson's "The Chopin Variations," performed with violinist Judy Kang and cellist Rubin Kodheli, presents the music of Chopin in a whole new way.

After being featured on NPR's All Things Considered, Chad Lawson's CD, The Chopin Variations, shot to No. 1 on iTunes Classical before it was even released in September, 2014. Lawson's interpretation of Chopin's nocturnes, preludes, and waltzes involves a surprising reconfiguration of the piano, and offers a sense of intimacy with the music that is likely new to most listeners.

WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston learns about the power of simplicity in her conversation with pianist Chad Lawson.

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Now Is the Time
11:09 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Available Forms on Now Is the Time

The Lark Quartet

Forms traditional, and those not so, arise on Now Is the Time, Saturday, April 18th at 9 pm. Composers often wrestle over titles, hoping to trumpet putative musical originality with a never-seen-before moniker. Paul Moravec, however, writes a piece for string quartet plus piano and calls it what it is: Piano Quintet. With the Lark Quartet, with pianist Jeremy Denk, and with his keen ear for profound energy, Moravec has that ease to call things what they are, and we are rewarded.

John Hodian’s six-part MMU-14 is mysteriously-titled but engagingly entertaining. Written way back in the 1980s, it’s a work of surface repetition, but listen closely, as it’s rare that any two measures are exactly like the next two. For overdubbed acoustic instruments, MMU-14 uses just a soupçon of electronics to produce an attractive yet propulsive drive.

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