Classical Through the Night on HD-2

Monday though Saturday, 10 pm to 6 am; Sunday, 11 pm to 6 am on HD-2 and the Classical Stream
  • Hosted by Peter Van de Graaf, heard on HD-2 and the classical stream

Host Peter Van de Graaff draws music selections from all eras, but focuses on works from the Baroque, Classical, and Romantic eras. While focusing on the standards of the repertoire, the show goes beyond that and draws from the rich and varied music that comprises all of what we call "classical music," shared in an interesting manner. 

WRTI's Mark Pinto fills us in on the latest classical music CDs Saturdays at 5 pm on Classical New Releases. Here are five newly released recordings he recommends. Take a look!

Mention the music of Vienna, and some of us automatically think of a waltz. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the city was a musical magnet for composers, especially from the late 18th century through the 19th and beyond.


Michael Patrick O’Leary

Violinist Hilary Hahn performs the fourth violin concerto of the Belgian composer and violinist Henri Vieuxtemps on The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast, Sunday, August 21st at 1 pm. This concerto is a favorite of Ms. Hahn’s; Vieuxtemps composed it while he was serving as violinist to Tsar Nicholas I in St. Petersburg.


Does a song, or even a symphony, trigger memories of important moments and milestones in your life? For violinist Hillary Hahn, a little-known, 19th-century concerto is an important part of her history and her current repertoire.


David Bromberg is best known as a guitar virtuoso, who has collaborated with Bob Dylan and George Harrison and fronted his own band. But he's also a collector of American violins, and his collection is such that the Library of Congress has announced its intention to acquire it.

At the gateway of August, summertime looks like it will never end—but it won’t be long until it begins to fade. On Now Is the Time, Saturday, July 30th at 9 pm on WRTI-HD2 and the all-classical webstream at wrti.org, Dan Becker starts us off with a cut from his Fade album that looks forward and back, ReInvention 1a. Imagine a J. S. Bach invention run through a digital piano with postminimalist leanings, and maybe you can imagine the excitement and quirkiness of this piece. Then, Jennifer Higdon’s Dash for flute, clarinet, and piano is all that and a cloud of dust.

Photo by Steve Weinik / City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program

A massive effort is underway to showcase Philadelphia’s vibrant and strong commitment to the arts during the Democratic National Convention. The city’s—and region's—artistic breadth and talent will be on display from noon until 6 pm each day of the convention from Monday, July 25th to Thursday, July 28th.

The wit and sparkle of Beethoven’s 8th Symphony, the nobility of one of the cornerstones of the cello repertory, Elgar’s Cello Concerto—played by the German-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser—and the brilliant set of Haydn Variations that led the 40-year-old Brahms to complete his first symphony three years later are all yours to enjoy on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast.


Seven of the world’s foremost choral composers have composed 15-minute musical responses to Dietrich Buxtehude’s Membra Jesu Nostri, a monumental sacred work of the German Baroque consisting of seven cantatas. The Crossing performs the new works alongside Buxtehude’s 1680 composition, with two leading ensembles in their respective fields of performance: Quicksilver Baroque and ICE, the International Contemporary Ensemble.

Angus McBean / Warner Classics

Violinist Yehudi Menuhin was born in NYC in 1916. In 1926, the child prodigy made his recital debut at the Manhattan Opera House and had his first concerto performance with the San Francisco Orchestra. From 1928 until the year of his death in 1999, Menuhin had the longest-running contract in the history of the recording industry with EMI Classics, which was recently acquired by Warner Classics.

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