Classical Through the Night

Monday though Saturday, 10 pm to 6 am; Sunday, 11 pm to 6 am on HD-2 and the Classical Stream
Peter Van de Graaf, heard on HD-2 and the classical stream

Host Peter Van de Graaff draws music selections from all eras, but focuses on works from the Baroque, Classical, and Romantic eras. While focusing on the standards of the repertoire, the show goes beyond that and draws from the rich and varied music that comprises all of what we call "classical music," shared in an interesting manner. 

Composer ID: 
53c7dc17e1c8b9c77b4b9bb8|53c7dbe1e1c8b9c77b4b9b6e

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
11:10 am
Wed July 1, 2015

The Fleisher Collection’s New Curator

Gary Galván, curator of the Fleisher Collection

On this month’s Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday, July 4th, 5-6 pm, we meet the new curator, Gary Galván. He’s worked at the Collection since 2005 on research and special projects, but this year took over the reins as the seventh curator of the world’s largest lending library of orchestral performance material. Galván will discuss the composers on the program and give us an idea of some of his plans for the future of the Collection.

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Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert
11:05 pm
Fri June 26, 2015

The Philadelphia Orchestra Takes Us to Other Worlds Sunday, June 28th at 1 PM!

From an ancient buried past in Pompeii to an outer-worldly future is The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI, transporting us to different worlds this Sunday, June 28th at 1 pm.

We’ll hear excerpts from Close Encounters of the Third Kind, John Williams’s music from the film, which was nominated for an Academy Award in 1977. It was his third collaboration with director Steven Spielberg, immediately following their great success with Jaws.

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WRTI Arts Desk
11:03 pm
Fri June 26, 2015

Close Encounters of the Concert Kind

Stéphane Denève

When can music composed for a film stand on its own? WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports on how John Williams’ suite from Close Encounters of the Third Kind translates to the concert stage.

On WRTI Sunday, June 28, 2015 at 1 pm, Stéphane Denève conducts The Philadelphia Orchestra in a program featuring excerpts of the music from Close Encounters of the Third Kind, as well as music by Lindberg and Prokofiev.

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WRTI Special Offers
9:59 am
Fri June 26, 2015

Special Offer: Save 25% on Philadelphia Orchestra All-Gershwin Concert at the Mann Center, June 26th

George Gershwin (1898-1937)

Join the Philadelphia Orchestra as they perform "A Night of Gershwin" at the Mann Center on June 26th. Celebrate the breadth of George Gershwin’s legacy with one of his most effervescent musical masterworks - Rhapsody in Blue; the first, and widely considered the finest American opera - Porgy and Bess; and the ultimate musical postcard to the folks back home - An American in Paris. Cristian Măcelaru, conductor. Terrence Wilson, piano. Norman Garrett, baritone. Taylor Johnson, soprano

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Deceptive Cadence
10:27 pm
Sun June 21, 2015

Gunther Schuller, Who Bridged Classical Music And Jazz, Dies At 89

Gunther Schuller, shown conducting Charles Mingus's Epitaph in 2007, was a Pulitzer Prize-winning composer, conductor and educator. He died Sunday at age 89.
Hiroyuki Ito Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 8:49 am

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WRTI Arts Desk
11:15 am
Mon June 15, 2015

What is the Most German Opera that is Loved Around the World?

Design for Weber's 'Der Freischütz,' Act 3, 1821 production

Before Richard Strauss, before Richard Wagner, more than Hansel and Gretel, and even more than Mozart, the most German opera is, and always will be, Der Freischütz by Carl Maria von Weber.

The Freeshooter or The Marksman tells the story of Max, a man so in love with Agatha that he sells his soul—almost. To win her hand he must first win a shooting match, accepting an offer for magic bullets, bullets that cannot miss. They are forged in the deep forest by Samiel, the personification of Evil.

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WRTI Arts Desk
6:55 am
Mon June 8, 2015

After 'The Rite of Spring,' Classical Music Was Never the Same

Debussy, Stravinsky, 1910
Erik Satie

In June of 1912, Igor Stravinsky premiered the piano version of his daring new work The Rite of Spring, a year before its orchestral unveiling. His piano-playing partner was none other than Claude Debussy. Classical music has never been the same since the public first heard it.
 

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
6:53 am
Sat June 6, 2015

The Overlooked French Composer, Jacques Ibert

On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday June 6th, 5 to 6 pm. Since his name is not Debussy or Ravel or Satie, and since his name was not in a group called “Les Six,” the overlooked French composer of the 20th century’s first half may well be Jacques Ibert. But since 2015 is the 125th anniversary of his birth, this is a good time for Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection to assess his music.

Critics have often called Jacques Ibert “eclectic,” but that may have more to do with their not being able to pigeon-hole him into one school of music or another. What stands out most of all about Ibert, though, is that he is a remarkably resourceful composer. His efficiently scored works are always beautiful, and more often than not have a theatrical flair.

He knew what he was doing from the beginning. He had already won the top prize, the Prix de Rome, at the Paris Conservatory, but then went into the French Navy during the First World War. Even through these years, however, his compositional gifts were percolating. He began a substantial orchestral work based on the Oscar Wilde poem, “The Ballad of Reading Gaol,” at this time. Wilde, who had been imprisoned at Reading, witnessed the hanging of a man who had murdered his wife. One line in the poem has become famous: “Each man kills the thing he loves.”

The 1922 premiere of The Ballad of Reading Gaol was conducted by fellow composer Gabriel Pierné, and was a success. Another success immediately followed it. Escales, or Ports of Call, is inspired by Ibert’s naval experiences in the Mediterranean. He salutes Rome and Palermo in the first movement, the Tunisian cities of Tunis and Nafta in the second, and gives over the final movement to the Spanish port of Valencia.

Ibert composed Divertissement as incidental music for a 1929 theatrical comedy, but within a year produced a concert version. It and Escales are his two most popular orchestral works, and along with Reading Gaol made a name for Ibert, opened doors to publishers, and eventually led to the directorship of the French Academy in Rome, where he spent much of his life as an ambassador in Italy for all things French. He composed operas, piano music, film music (even for Gene Kelly and Orson Welles), and much else.

His life was not without setback, however. World War II interrupted his stay in Italy, and then the Nazi-allied Vichy government ruling France banned his music. He ended up in Switzerland, but returned to France—and his beloved Italy—when peace returned to Europe.

So for the 125th anniversary of the birth of Jacques Ibert it’s two familiar works, and (because it’s Discoveries) something not so. All in all, it’s the hard-to-label but nevertheless gorgeous music of Jacques Ibert.

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The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI
11:45 am
Fri June 5, 2015

The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI: Mozart and Beethoven on Sunday, June 7th at 1 PM

Paul Goodwin conducts this week's concert broadcast.

By the time our Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast airs on Sunday, June 7th, the Orchestra will have just completed its European tour with a concert at the Royal Festival Hall in London. WRTI will, however, continue to air Philadelphia Orchestra broadcasts of this season’s concerts through early July.

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WRTI Arts Desk
1:19 pm
Tue June 2, 2015

Don't Hit the Snooze Alarm...March to the Sousalarm!

Bridget and Emma, from Monmouth Junction, NJ, are two very proud and excited members of the Sousalarm Club.

A good march can really get the blood pumping, and what better time for that than 7:15 am?  Now, WRTI intern Shoshana Slavitt takes a look at the 26-year history of the Sousalarm.

If you're an early bird and a lover of marching bands, then you should tune in to the radio station WRTI for the 7:15 am Sousalarm.  What is the Sousalarm?  The Sousalarm is the march, usually composed by John Philip Sousa, that helps listeners wake up in the morning on weekdays.

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