Susan Lewis

Arts & Culture Reporter

Susan is an arts and culture reporter for WRTI. She contributes Arts Desk features, and weekly intermission interviews for The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast series on WRTI with host Gregg Whiteside.

She is also a freelance essayist, journalist, and speechwriter who has written about Philadelphia for Insight Guides and Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation's Culture Files.  A former columnist for Philadelphia Magazine, she is the author of Reinventing Ourselves after Motherhood and a book of essays. Her work has appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer, Child Magazine, Parents Magazine, Reader's Digest and Ladies' Home Journal (Parents Digest).

Born and raised in Philadelphia, Susan is also a lawyer, with a B.A. in Philosophy from Trinity College, Connecticut, and a J.D. from New York University School of Law. She has practiced law in New York City and taught entertainment law at Rutgers Law School in Camden.

Ways to Connect

A violinist who has embraced a wide range of repertoire finds music making to be a profound form of human expression. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on this internationally renowned soloist.

The Barnes Foundation

One of the unusual aspects of the Barnes Foundation is its wrought iron collection – shoe buckles, hinges, latches, and other objects integrated throughout the galleries. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Albert Barnes’ fascination with, and approach to, metal works - now the subject of two special exhibitions.


The legend of Don Juan, dating from the mid 17th century, has spawned plays, poetry, opera, and more.  Richard Strauss’s 1889 tone poem about the story launched his star in the European musical world.


Englishman Bramwell Tovey is an accomplished pianist, composer and conductor. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he’s also upbeat about the power of music to reach people of all ages. 


The four DePue brothers (Wallace, Jason, Zack, and Alex) were raised on classical music, barbershop, and Bluegrass. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, today they’re juggling work at conventional ensembles - The Philadelphia Orchestra, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, and the Philly Pops - with a family-based band specializing in a blend of classical and American grass roots music.

Chris Lee

On Tuesday evening, December 8th at Carnegie Hall,  the long-standing organization Musical America - known for its comprehensive directory of the music business - celebrated recipients of its 2016 awards for musical excellence. In a room full of supporters, managers, fellow artists and press, trophies were given to artist, composer, instrumentalist, vocalist, and ensemble of the year.

Jessica Griffin / The Philadelphia Orchestra

Among the works Sergei Rachmaninov promoted were his variations on themes of other composers. The Philadelphia Orchestra - and the bright, new star Daniil Trifonov - are shining a new light on a popular piece as well as lesser-known works in the genre.

Scottish conductor Donald Runnicles is busy with leadership positions in the opera and symphonic worlds in Germany, Scotland, and America.  WRTI’s  Susan Lewis profiles Runnicles, who is also a regular guest conductor with The Philadelphia Orchestra.  


Stephen Hahn

It’s just after 1:00 in the afternoon, and I’m holding up a wall backstage at the Kimmel Center, after watching a Philadelphia Orchestra rehearsal with Music Director Yannick Nezet-Seguin and soloist Hilary Hahn. Musicians are heading out, the hall is emptying.

Hulton archive

After publicly resisting the growing fascism in Europe in the 1930s, Hungarian pianist and composer Bela Bartok eventually fled his homeland. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he wrote his Second Violin Concerto not long before emigrating to the United States.


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