Susan Lewis

Arts & Culture Reporter

Susan is an arts and culture reporter for WRTI. She contributes weekly features to Creatively Speaking with Jim Cotter, produces arts news, and works as a news anchor.

She is also a freelance essayist, journalist, and speechwriter who has written about Philadelphia for Insight Guides and Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation's Culture Files.  A former columnist for Philadelphia Magazine, she is the author of Reinventing Ourselves after Motherhood and a book of essays. Her work has appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer, Child Magazine, Parents Magazine, Reader's Digest and Ladies' Home Journal (Parents Digest).

Born and raised in Philadelphia, Susan is also a lawyer, with a B.A. in Philosophy from Trinity College, Connecticut, and a J.D. from New York University School of Law.  She has practiced law in New York City and taught entertainment law at Rutgers Law School in Camden.

Pages

Creatively Speaking
12:21 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

A Master Percussionist Nurturing the Next Generation

Percussionist Alan Abel

This week, percussion students from the U.S. and countries as far away as Argentina and Asia are gathering at Temple’s Boyer College of Music and Dance for a seminar led by a former Philadelphia Orchestra percussionist.  As WRTI's Susan Lewis reports, Alan Abel continues year round to share his talents as a musician and craftsman.

Read more
Creatively Speaking
5:40 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Exploring Mozart's Musical Mysteries with 19-Year-Old Superstar Pianist Jan Lisiecki

Polish/Canadian pianist Jan Lisiecki was Gramophone Magazine's 2013 Young Artist of the Year.

Among Mozart’s hundreds of compositions are 27 piano concertos. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the young pianist Jan Lisiecki, who is making his mark today, is drawn to their musical purity, emotional complexity, and sense of fun.

Read more
Creatively Speaking
6:01 am
Mon June 9, 2014

The Very Political Ludwig van Beethoven

The second movement of Beethoven's Symphony No. 7 is "kind of a march," says Christoph von Dohnanyi, "in respect for all the victims who suffered by Napoleon's attacks."

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) wrote his seventh symphony in the midst of Napoleon’s attempts to conquer Europe. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the work, and its second movement in particular, is a tribute to freedom. Here, the Israel Philharmonic conducted by Zubin Mehta, performs:

Read more
Creatively Speaking
12:56 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Great Composers Memorialized in Fairmount Park

Bust of Franz Schubert by Henry Baerer, 1891 in West Fairmount Park, east of Horticultural Hall. Bronze sculpture with limestone base and granite with bronze plaque.

Among the hundreds of outdoor sculptures that dot Philadelphia’s urban landscape are three classical music masters. But they're not where you might expect to find them.

Read more
Creatively Speaking
12:28 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Written in Secret Musical Codes: Shostakovich's 10th Symphony

Dmitri Shostakovich (1906 - 1975)

Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich, who had been in and out of favor with Soviet authorities for decades, wrote his 10th symphony in 1953 - the year Stalin died. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the work is both political and personal, with parts written in musical code.

On Sunday, June 8, 2014, on WRTI, Stephane Deneve leads The Philadelphia Orchestra in a performance of Shostakovich's 10th Symphony and Beethoven's Violin Concerto.

Read more
Creatively Speaking
9:06 am
Mon May 26, 2014

The Ney: An Ancient Flute Celebrated in a Modern Work

The flute is one of the oldest musical instruments, with its earliest versions found thousands of years ago in different cultures. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, a recently composed flute concerto celebrates one of its ancient bamboo ancestors.

On Sunday, June 1, 2014, on WRTI, Jeffrey Khaner and The Philadelphia Orchestra perform Behzad Ranjbaran’s Flute Concerto.

Read more
Creatively Speaking
8:39 am
Mon May 26, 2014

The Bassoon's Lyrical Beauty

Daniel Matsukawa

Many great composers in history wrote for the bassoon. But in the last 70 years or so, the instrument has often been associated with one particular bouncy melody from a classic animated film. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, a recent premiere reminds us of the bassoon’s lyrical beauty.

On Sunday June 1, 2014, on WRTI, Daniel Matsukawa and The Philadelphia Orchestra perform David Ludwig’s Pictures from the Floating World.

Read more
Creatively Speaking
12:31 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Shining a Light on Italian Composer, Pianist, and Conductor Alfredo Casella

Italian composer, pianist, and conductor Alfredo Casella (1883 - 1947)

Early 20th-century Italian composer, pianist, and conductor Alfredo Casella promoted music of his compatriots. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the 21st-century conductor Giandrea Noseda is shining a light on Casella’s lesser-known work.

Listen to a performance of Alfredo Casella's Barcarola e Scherzo for Flute and Piano, Op. 4 (1903):

Read more
Creatively Speaking
12:48 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

A New Principal Guest Conductor for The Philadelphia Orchestra

As Principal Guest Conductor, Stephane Deneve will be part of the creative planning process, and lead several subscription weeks, family programs, and summer concerts in Vail and Saratoga.

The Philadelphia Orchestra has named a Principal Guest Conductor for a three-year term beginning this fall. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on the appointment of the internationally known conductor Stephane Deneve, who has been a frequent guest since making his debut with the Orchestra in 2007.

Read more
Creatively Speaking
4:35 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

The Legacy of Jazz Singer Shirley Horn

Jazz singer Shirley Horn (1934-2005)

Born this month in 1934, Shirley Horn studied classical music before turning to jazz in the 1950s. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, Horn became known for her distinctive singing, which she did most often from the keyboard.

Find out more about Phyliss Chapell's upcoming performances.

Read more

Pages