Meridee Duddleston

News Reporter, Arts Desk Reporter

Meridee began reporting in the newsroom at WRTI in 2003 while working toward a master's degree in journalism at Temple University.  Since that time, her duties have expanded to morning news anchor and contributor of weekly Arts Desk features.

A graduate of Hamline University School of Law, Meridee grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota, and practiced law before making a major leap into the world of journalism. She also holds a graduate degree from New York University School of Law and received a B.A in Political Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

In 2011, Meridee was recognized for outstanding public affairs reporting by the Pennsylvania Associated Press Broadcaster's Association (PAPBA) with awards for two News & Views stories. She received 1st place for "Baby Boomers Becoming Seniors: A Growing Population in Philadelphia," and 2nd place for "TUNE UP PHILLY: Classical Music Instruction as a Vehicle for Social Change."

Meridee can be heard weekday mornings between 6 and 10 am.

Ways To Connect

Steady work is a coveted and rare prize among many jazz musicians. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston visits a force in the local jazz scene who never had a problem getting gigs. Recognized by Mayor Michael Nutter for his enduring contribution to the city’s jazz scene,  jazz drummer Charlie Rice has been keeping the beat for more than 70 years and counting.

Information about Jazz Bridge concerts at Collingswood Community Center

One of the most prominent bands in nation, and the country's oldest, continuously active musical organization, is frequently heard on WRTI's weekday 7:15 am Sousalarm. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston shares a glimpse of the U.S. Marine Band.

Falling off the podium or into the orchestra pit weren’t the occupational hazards befalling French Baroque composer Jean-Baptiste Lully - but his was no less risky. Temple University Professor Steven Zohn, an expert in Baroque music, recounts the conducting move that led to Lully’s death.

Zohn says Lully, who first came to the attention of King Louis XIV as a dancer, profited from his relationship with the monarch - and his power over the musical facets of the royal court became wider and wider. 

The artistry and athleticism of the ballet dancer can soar with a well-fitting pointe shoe. On a given weekend, members of three generations of the Jenkins family might be on the scene at The Rosin Box, a jewel-like shop on Sansom Street in Philadelphia, just a few blocks from Rittenhouse Square, where ballet slippers and pointe shoes are sold - and, where music lives.

A musician’s understanding of his artistry often deepens over time. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston gets a perspective from a jazz man who’s performed for over a half century. Guitarist and vocalist Jimi Odell has been called one of Philadelphia’s best-kept secrets. And even though he wasn’t born here, local jazz buffs proudly claim him as their own. Now in his '80s, Odell bought himself a guitar and an instruction book when he was 19. Looking back he says it’s not an easy instrument to master.

Founded in Philadelphia in 1876, J.W. Pepper has a long history connected to its seminal role in the proliferation of music to bands, churches, choirs, orchestras, and school ensembles across the United States. Its publication of sheet music extends from the day of the town band, through the birth of jazz and rock, to the present.

All across the country, April is Jazz Appreciation Month (JAM). In Philadelphia, JAM's month-long series of concerts, workshops, and events - including the Center City Jazz Festival - culminates on April 30th, which is Jazz Appreciation Day.

Jazz vocalist, author, and playwright Suzanne Cloud spent about eight months researching Dizzy Gillespie’s life, and writing Last Call at the Downbeat: The Dizzy Gillespie Story. The production debuted in 2013 at the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts.

Three former Curtis students have been winning over audiences with their chemistry, virtuosity, and ability to think outside the classical music box for over a decade. Zach De Pue and Nick Kendall play violin; Ranaan Meyer plays double bass. Philadelphia composer Jennifer Higdon composed Concerto 4-3 with "Time for Three" (tf3) in mind.  WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston spoke with Meyer last November when the trio was in Utah to perform at a benefit for the Utah Symphony.

It was Peter Nero and the Philly POPS from the orchestra’s inception in 1979. But after taking over for Nero last July, Michael Krajewski is creating his own signature as music director.  In the midst of his first season, the in-demand conductor has high praise for the Philly POPs orchestra as he creates his own brand of the fun, entertainment, and surprise that is part of the POPS experience.  

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