Meridee Duddleston

News Reporter, Arts Desk Reporter

Meridee began reporting in the newsroom at WRTI in 2003 while working toward a master's degree in journalism at Temple University.  Since that time, her duties have expanded to morning news anchor and contributor of weekly Arts Desk features.

A graduate of Hamline University School of Law, Meridee grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota, and practiced law before making a major leap into the world of journalism. She also holds a graduate degree from New York University School of Law and received a B.A in Political Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

In 2011, Meridee was recognized for outstanding public affairs reporting by the Pennsylvania Associated Press Broadcaster's Association (PAPBA) with awards for two News & Views stories. She received 1st place for "Baby Boomers Becoming Seniors: A Growing Population in Philadelphia," and 2nd place for "TUNE UP PHILLY: Classical Music Instruction as a Vehicle for Social Change."

Meridee can be heard weekday mornings between 6 and 10 am.

Ways to Connect

Although you may not realize that it was first composed as a military march, you’ll instantly recognize one of Sir Edward Elgar’s most popular works, "Pomp and Circumstance, March No. 1 in D," - especially the nearly two-minute middle section so commonly associated with graduation. 

Kate Raines/Plate 3 Photography

As the lights go down, and the play or opera begins, you may be wondering about the meaning of a word you read in the theater program. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston introduces Sarah Ollove, who says most people don't have a clue what her job entails.  

Deneka Peniston

The virtuosity of the legendary Miles Davis speaks through another trumpeter who follows him in tune and time. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston talks with the musician behind the sound in the newly released biopic, Miles Ahead.

The late Eartha Kitt’s strength, vulnerability, and sensuality inspired singer/songwriter René Marie’s 2014 Grammy-nominated album, I Wanna be Evil, With Love to Eartha Kitt.  Marie knows firsthand the risks of setting a new course in life.  When she was in her 40s, she quit her day job at a bank to devote herself to singing and composing fulltime. It was a decision that was not without repercussions. And about a year later, her marriage ended.

For a musician, the words “sanctuary,” “retreat,” and “haven” suggest attractive possibilities for creative expression. The Jazz Residency Program at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts isn’t based on the isolation these places evoke, but it does provide an environment conducive to a creative stream. The program is aimed at local jazz artists who can write music.

Mayor Michael Nutter and the City of Philadelphia invited jazz pianist and composer MyCoy Tyner back to his roots for an official recognition of his contribution to the city’s jazz legacy last year. It was a wonderful way to kick off Jazz Appreciation Month in Philadelphia.

How does a lifelong interest in the choral works of J.S. Bach maintain a luster that continues to this day? World-renowned German conductor, scholar, and teacher Helmuth Rilling gives WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston some insight.

Tony Webb / City of Philadelphia, 2016

When the Newport Jazz Festival announced that Philadelphia-born musician Christian McBride would assume the role of its artistic director in 2017, festival founder and current producer George Wein said,  "When I first met Christian McBride in 1989, I knew he was someone special."  

Ensemble view, Room 1, south wall, Philadelphia, 2012. Photo © 2016 The Barnes Foundation

In fall 2015, the Barnes Foundation announced that more than one million visitors had passed through its doors on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. But the enriching impact of art isn’t necessarily confined to a single space. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston speaks with recently appointed Chief Curator Sylvie Patry to find out how the incomparable collection hopes to expand its rooted reach.

Pete Checchia / The Philadelphia Orchestra

The 800 members of the League of American Orchestras come from across the country. They include big, small, and medium-sized ensembles, and related arts and cultural organizations. Jesse Rosen is the president and CEO of the League. He spoke with WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston about some of the things happening around the nation as orchestras reinvent their approaches to concerts and audiences.