Meridee Duddleston

News Reporter, Arts Desk Reporter

Meridee began reporting in the newsroom at WRTI in 2003 while working toward a master's degree in journalism at Temple University.  Since that time, her duties have expanded to morning news anchor and contributor of weekly Arts Desk features.

A graduate of Hamline University School of Law, Meridee grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota, and practiced law before making a major leap into the world of journalism. She also holds a graduate degree from New York University School of Law and received a B.A in Political Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

In 2011, Meridee was recognized for outstanding public affairs reporting by the Pennsylvania Associated Press Broadcaster's Association (PAPBA) with awards for two News & Views stories. She received 1st place for "Baby Boomers Becoming Seniors: A Growing Population in Philadelphia," and 2nd place for "TUNE UP PHILLY: Classical Music Instruction as a Vehicle for Social Change."

Meridee can be heard weekday mornings between 6 and 10 am.

Ways to Connect

The Greater Philadelphia Martin Luther King Day of Service is the largest event of its kind in the country.  Volunteers spread out across the region to perform all kinds of service projects. Thousands converge on the campus of Girard College for a full slate of activities, including a job fair. 

The Philadelphia Orchestra commemorates the day with a free tribute concert; and for the last three years, the Orchestra has performed in the fully packed chapel at Girard College

Ludwig van Beethoven’s "Les Adieux" or "The Farewell" sonata (Piano Sonata No. 26) is considered the composer's most significant work from the period between 1809 - 1810. It was a time when the Napoleonic Wars continued to bring upheaval to Beethoven’s adopted city of Vienna, the surrounding region, and beyond.

Theories abound about why the violins created in Cremona, Italy from the mid 1500s to the mid 1700s serve as the benchmark among masterpieces. Intriguing research by acoustics experts from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology might provide a clue.

Today, The Nutcracker ballet is as much a Christmas tradition as eggnog, jingle bells, and mistletoe. But centuries ago - long before a nutcracker appeared on stage - miners in the rural Ore Mountain region of Germany began crafting the ubiquitous household characters. The whimsical, dual-purpose figurines were toys that inspired play among the young, and tools that cracked nuts for all.

A group of Philadelphia-area musicians who share a love of early music, made Renaissance bands new 30 years ago. Their range of instruments? It includes shawms, dulcians, sackbuts, recorders, krumhorns, bagpipes, lutes, guitars, harps, and a variety of percussion.  Earlier this year, the artistic directors of Piffaro, The Renaissance Band provided WRTI's Meridee Duddleston with a glimpse of their musical roots.

Tenor sax player, composer, and arranger Tim Warfield has been performing professionally since he was sixteen.  He was able to improvise at a very early age and says that by now he thinks of the saxophone as an extension of himself.

Drawing on the musically rich resources of Philadelphia, conductor Andreas Delfs plans to put his stamp on how universities can be agents of change, and has bold ideas for reinventing the presentation of classical music. What will a symphony concert be like 10 years from now, or even five? Mobile apps, multi-media elements, pop-up venues, cocktails?

The Philadelphia-based tenor sax player and composer Odean Pope is known worldwide in jazz circles for his impeccable artistry and for his Saxophone Choir. He's had a steady gig at the Blue Note in NYC for many years, and is a longtime soloist with the Max Roach Quartet.

A Philadelphia Orchestra musician is about to gain a national audience for a hobby that’s not based on sound. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston has more.


The Smithsonian Institution

The national melody that's notoriously hard to sing, owes its musical roots to a private men's club. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston hears the "the bombs bursting in air" anew.

Pages