Meridee Duddleston

News Reporter, Arts & Culture Reporter

Meridee began reporting in the newsroom at WRTI in 2003 while working toward a master's degree in journalism at Temple University.  Since that time, her duties have expanded to news anchor and contributor to WRTI's arts and culture series, Creatively Speaking.

A graduate of Hamline University School of Law, Meridee grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota, and practiced law before making a major leap into the world of journalism. She also holds a graduate degree from New York University School of Law and received a B.A in Political Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

In 2011, Meridee was recognized for outstanding public affairs reporting by the Pennsylvania Associated Press Broadcaster's Association (PAPBA) with awards for two News & Views stories. She received 1st place for "Baby Boomers Becoming Seniors: A Growing Population in Philadelphia," and 2nd place for "TUNE UP PHILLY: Classical Music Instruction as a Vehicle for Social Change."

Meridee can be heard weekday mornings between 6 and 10 am.

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Creatively Speaking
7:41 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Graduation and Elgar's "Pomp and Circumstance"- What's the Connection?

Although you may not realize that it was first composed as a military march, you’ll instantly recognize one of Sir Edward Elgar’s most popular works, "Pomp and Circumstance, March No. 1 in D," - especially the nearly two-minute middle section so commonly associated with graduation.  

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Creatively Speaking
7:21 am
Mon May 5, 2014

Celebrating C.P.E. Bach: The Sentimental Rebel

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (March 8, 1714 – December 14, 1788)

J.S. Bach’s second-surviving son, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714-1788), was a musical force in his own right. His fame, at least after the mid-1700s, overshadowed that of his now-legendary father. This year, six German cities with ties to C.P.E.’s musical footprint in Hamburg, Berlin, Frankfurt (Oder), Leipzig, Potsdam, and Weimar are leading a celebration of the 300th anniversary of his birth.   

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Creatively Speaking
5:20 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Did the Cabaret Tax Kill Big Bands?

The Cotton Club, New York City

In 1944 big dance bands were  all the rage.  They were so popular that to gain additional revenue for World War II,  a 30 percent "cabaret tax" was enforced on the gross receipts of any "public place where music and dancing privileges...except instrumental or mechanical music alone,  are afforded the patrons in connection with the serving or selling of food, refreshment, or merchandise."

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Creatively Speaking
3:49 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

It's Official! The City Of Philadelphia Appreciates Jazz

April is Jazz Appreciation Month

All across the country, April is Jazz Appreciation Month (JAM). In Philadelphia, JAM's month-long series of concerts, workshops, and events - including the Center City Jazz Festival - culminates on April 30th, which is Jazz Appreciation Day.

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Creatively Speaking
8:22 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

Last Call at the Downbeat: The Dizzy Gillespie Story

Trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie (1917-1993)

Jazz vocalist, author, and playwright Suzanne Cloud spent about eight months researching Dizzy Gillespie’s life, and writing Last Call at the Downbeat: The Dizzy Gillespie Story. The production debuted in 2013 at the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts.

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Creatively Speaking
11:08 am
Mon March 24, 2014

The Fiddlers of Time for Three: Not Your Average Classical Music Trio

The musicians of Time for Three are (left to right) Zach De Pue, Ranaan Meyer, and Nick Kendall.

Three former Curtis students have been winning over audiences with their chemistry, virtuosity, and ability to think outside the classical music box for over a decade. Zach De Pue and Nick Kendall play violin; Ranaan Meyer plays double bass. Philadelphia composer Jennifer Higdon composed Concerto 4-3 with "Time for Three" (tf3) in mind.  WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston spoke with Meyer last November when the trio was in Utah to perform at a benefit for the Utah Symphony.

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Creatively Speaking
7:46 am
Mon March 10, 2014

You LOVE The Philly POPS...Admit It!

Philly POPS Music Director Michael Krajewski

It was Peter Nero and the Philly POPS from the orchestra’s inception in 1979. But after taking over for Nero last July, Michael Krajewski is creating his own signature as music director.  In the midst of his first season, the in-demand conductor has high praise for the Philly POPs orchestra as he creates his own brand of the fun, entertainment, and surprise that is part of the POPS experience.  

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Creatively Speaking
7:29 am
Mon February 24, 2014

A Quick Lesson on the Clarinet

You know it when you hear it. Deep and shrill, resonant and bright, smooth or not – the clarinet adds a diverse range to the woodwind family. Temple University Associate Professor of Music Emily Threinen gave WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston a quick course on its historic origins.

 

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Creatively Speaking
11:35 am
Mon February 17, 2014

A Young Composer's Musical Mirror to Iraq War Veteran's Haunting Novel

Composer Alyssa Weinberg

Curtis graduate student Alyssa Weinberg read and re-read this year’s One Book, One Philadelphia choice as she composed Prayer, her work inspired by The Yellow Birds. With war as its setting, the novel by Kevin Powers makes a zigzag journey in time and place between Iraq, Fort Dix, a base in Germany, and Virginia - the place a young Private Bartle leaves, and returns to, profoundly changed.

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Creatively Speaking
10:26 am
Tue February 11, 2014

"One Book" We're Reading This Year in Philadelphia: The Yellow Birds

The Free Library of Philadelphia's One Book, One Philadelphia selection for 2014 is The Yellow Birds, written by Kevin Powers, an Iraq War veteran. He says he didn't set out to write a sweeping epic about the war, but rather tried to create a complete picture of the psychological, emotional, and physical experience the war has on 21-year-old Private Bartle. 

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