Meridee Duddleston

News Reporter, Arts Desk Reporter

Meridee began reporting in the newsroom at WRTI in 2003 while working toward a master's degree in journalism at Temple University.  Since that time, her duties have expanded to morning news anchor and contributor of weekly Arts Desk features.

A graduate of Hamline University School of Law, Meridee grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota, and practiced law before making a major leap into the world of journalism. She also holds a graduate degree from New York University School of Law and received a B.A in Political Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

In 2011, Meridee was recognized for outstanding public affairs reporting by the Pennsylvania Associated Press Broadcaster's Association (PAPBA) with awards for two News & Views stories. She received 1st place for "Baby Boomers Becoming Seniors: A Growing Population in Philadelphia," and 2nd place for "TUNE UP PHILLY: Classical Music Instruction as a Vehicle for Social Change."

Meridee can be heard weekday mornings between 6 and 10 am.

Ways to Connect

For a musician, the words “sanctuary,” “retreat,” and “haven” suggest attractive possibilities for creative expression. The Jazz Residency Program at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts isn’t based on the isolation these places evoke, but it does provide an environment conducive to a creative stream. The program is aimed at local jazz artists who can write music.

Mayor Michael Nutter and the City of Philadelphia invited jazz pianist and composer MyCoy Tyner back to his roots for an official recognition of his contribution to the city’s jazz legacy last year. It was a wonderful way to kick off Jazz Appreciation Month in Philadelphia.

How does a lifelong interest in the choral works of J.S. Bach maintain a luster that continues to this day? World-renowned German conductor, scholar, and teacher Helmuth Rilling gives WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston some insight.


Tony Webb / City of Philadelphia, 2016

When the Newport Jazz Festival announced that Philadelphia-born musician Christian McBride would assume the role of its artistic director in 2017, festival founder and current producer George Wein said,  "When I first met Christian McBride in 1989, I knew he was someone special."  

The vocal virtuosity of one of the last century’s jazz giants lives on through those who came after her, scores of albums, and now a U.S. Postal Service stamp. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston and Bob Perkins consider the late, great Sarah Vaughan.

Ensemble view, Room 1, south wall, Philadelphia, 2012. Photo © 2016 The Barnes Foundation

In fall 2015, the Barnes Foundation announced that more than one million visitors had passed through its doors on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. But the enriching impact of art isn’t necessarily confined to a single space. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston speaks with recently appointed Chief Curator Sylvie Patry to find out how the incomparable collection hopes to expand its rooted reach.

Pete Checchia / The Philadelphia Orchestra

The 800 members of the League of American Orchestras come from across the country. They include big, small, and medium-sized ensembles, and related arts and cultural organizations. Jesse Rosen is the president and CEO of the League. He spoke with WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston about some of the things happening around the nation as orchestras reinvent their approaches to concerts and audiences. 

Steady work is a coveted and rare prize among many jazz musicians.  WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston visits a force in the local jazz scene who never had a problem getting gigs.  Jazz drummer Charlie Rice has been keeping the beat for more than 70 years and counting.  In April, 2012 the City of Philadelphia recognized Rice as a Jazz Appreciation Month honoree.

© 2016 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York | Gift of Ferdinand Howald

An exhibition of paintings, drawings, ballet costumes, and more - on display at the Barnes Foundation - captures a shift in the vision of one of the 20th century’s best-known and influential artists.  WRTI's Meridee Duddleston reports on a current show revolving around Pablo Picasso, an artist who continually surprised the critics, the public, and his compatriots.

The novel, Cold Mountain is a searing story of a Confederate soldier who walks away from the Civil War back home to the Blue Ridge Mountains and his love Ada. The best seller, published nearly 20 years ago, has already inspired a movie and most recently, an opera.

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