Jack Moore

Classical Host

Jack has been in the broadcasting biz for over 30 years, and his career has covered every aspect of the radio industry from on-air hosting to programming, and from sales to management. His many years of experience include stints at radio stations in Philadelphia, New Jersey, and upstate New York, including six years at WFLN. Jack joined WRTI in 1997 as a classical host and has been program director since 2002.

At Glassboro State College (now Rowan University), Jack majored in music. He still maintains an active professional career as a violist and conductor and has been music director of the Ambler Symphony since 1996; principal conductor of the Orchestra Society of Philadelphia since 1997; and music director of the Olney Symphony since 2002.

Jack is a frequent guest conductor of orchestras throughout the region, including the Ocean City Pops, the Bucks County Symphony, and the Old York Road Symphony. He has also worked with educational and school orchestras in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland and has appeared with symphonies in Europe and Russia.

Jack can be heard on weekdays from 10 am to 2 pm, and on the first Saturday of each month from 5 to 6 pm.

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WRTI Spotlight
8:03 am
Sun May 27, 2012

The Crossing on ENCORE!

On Sunday, May 27th, from 3 to 5 pm, THE CROSSING choir will be on the air - bringing you the first concert in their 2012 Month of Moderns summer festival.

Donald Nally leads the acclaimed virtuoso choir in Vermillion Vespers, a new work by Haverford College Professor of Music Curt Cacioppo. It's a significant addition to the limited repertoire of concert-length works for choir and organ.

Complete Program:

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WRTI Spotlight
8:00 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Raymond Leppard: A Life in Music on ENCORE!

On Sunday, May 27th, from 5 to 6 pm, it's the final installment of the 13-part series focusing on the life and career of Conductor Raymond Leppard, who is now the conductor laureate of  the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra after a 14-year tenure.

Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
1:28 pm
Sat March 10, 2012

The Great American Composer and Conductor Howard Hanson

An ancient Roman seeking signs from the flights of birds would climb the Janiculum hill, overlooking the city from the west, across the Tiber. If an augur had been stationed there in 1921, he might just as well have considered the progress of a young Howard Hanson, from Wahoo, Nebraska, son of Swedish immigrants, and the first winner of the American Rome Prize for musical composition. Hanson lived for three years at the American Academy in Rome, which sits on that very hill.

Program:

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At Your Request

This is your opportunity to request the classical pieces you want to hear. Join the fun! Fill out the form below, and then we'll do our best to get your selection on the air!

Just tell us: the name of the classical work, the name of the composer, your name and the city you live in, if you're a WRTI Member, and any comments you may have about why you're requesting this particular piece.

This is how it works: From the 50 to 60 requests received each week, we select 10 to 15 pieces that balance each other when played during the three-hour program. The three hours sound very similar to regular classical music programming - the exception being that the host mentions the name of the person requesting the music.

Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection

In Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, we uncover the unknown, rediscover the little-known, and take a fresh look at some of the remarkable treasures housed in the Edwin A. Fleisher Collection of Orchestral Music in the Free Library of Philadelphia. The Fleisher Collection is the largest lending library of orchestral performance material in the world.

Classical Weekdays

WRTI brings you the best recordings of works from the vast world of classical music every weekday from 6 am to 6 pm. Chamber music, symphonies, choral works, violin concertos, piano sonatas, and more...engagingly presented with insight and a smile by our knowledgeable hosts.

Playlists are at the bottom of this page.

Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
11:18 am
Sat February 4, 2012

The Music of Igor Stravinsky

Rimsky-Korsakov was not a man given to high praise. So when he wrote the words "Not bad" in his diary about the music of one of his students, that was unusually complimentary. The student was Igor Stravinsky.

Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971). Symphony No. 1 (1907). Scottish National Orchestra, Sir Alexander Gibson. Chandos 8345, CD1, Tr 1-4. 33:14

Igor Stravinsky. Capriccio (1929). Geoffrey Tozer, piano, Orc hestre de la Suisse Romande, Neeme Jarvi. Chandos 9238, Tr 8-10. 16:59

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
4:50 pm
Sat January 7, 2012

The Musical World of Bela Bartok

The Hungarian Fine Arts Commission told Bartok in 1911 that his opera, the only one he would ever write, was no good, not suitable for the stage. With only two singers and no set changes, Bluebeard's Castle just wasn't operatic. He'd later tinker with it some, but the immediate effect of the rejection was that, for four years, he almost completely stopped writing music. Now recognized as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century, Bela Bartok--just entering the height of his powers--went into a composing blackout.

Program:

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News and Views
9:21 am
Mon December 5, 2011

Curious about Classical? Our Hosts Share Some Interesting Musical Facts

Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
10:11 am
Sat December 3, 2011

Musical Jewels of Jean Sibelius

Gustav Mahler famously remarked that the symphony "must be like the world - it must embrace everything." This explains those disjunct themes delightfully butting against each other in his symphonies. What is often forgotten is that he said this to disagree with Jean Sibelius, who told Mahler that every part of a symphony must have a logical, ruthless interconnection with every other part. Not the world, replies Sibelius: a symphony is like the earth.

Program:

Jean Sibelius (1865-1957)

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