Jack Moore

Classical Host

Jack has been in the broadcasting biz for over 30 years, and his career has covered every aspect of the radio industry from on-air hosting to programming, and from sales to management. His many years of experience include stints at radio stations in Philadelphia, New Jersey, and upstate New York, including six years at WFLN. Jack joined WRTI in 1997 as a classical host and has been program director since 2002.

At Glassboro State College (now Rowan University), Jack majored in music. He still maintains an active professional career as a violist and conductor and has been music director of the Ambler Symphony since 1996; principal conductor of the Orchestra Society of Philadelphia since 1997; and music director of the Olney Symphony since 2002.

Jack is a frequent guest conductor of orchestras throughout the region, including the Ocean City Pops, the Bucks County Symphony, and the Old York Road Symphony. He has also worked with educational and school orchestras in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland and has appeared with symphonies in Europe and Russia.

Jack can be heard on weekdays from 10 am to 2 pm, and on the first Saturday of each month from 5 to 6 pm.

Ways To Connect

There's an interesting mix on this month's APPLAUSE with the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia. One of Joseph Haydn's best-loved symphonies, and the premier of Michel Legrand's concerto for harp and orchestra, make up this month's broadcast, hosted by WRTI's Dave Conant, Sunday, March 16, 5 to 6 pm.

John Corigliano's Troubadors, Variations for Guitar and Orchestra, opens our broadcast of Symphony in C Sunday, at 3 pm.  Philip Mann guest conducts, and acclaimed guitarist Jason Vieaux plays this 1993 work by Corigliano, which the composer describes as a "lyrical" concerto.  The concert concludes with one of Tchaikovsky's best known symphonies, the No. 5 in E minor.  Sunday, March 16, 3 to 5 pm on WRTI.

Jason Vieaux performing in 2010:

Paul Sirochman

Giuseppe Verdi's three-act masterpiece La Traviata (The Fallen Woman) will be heard in its entirety Sunday afternoon on WRTI, following our Philadelphia Orchestra broadcast. The opera, with libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, is based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas. Originally, the opera was to be titled "Violetta" after the main character of the opera. It's one of Verdi's most beloved and frequently performed works.

Dirk Brossé is joined by three acclaimed organists on this month's broadcast by The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia. Matthew Glandorf, Alan Morrison, and Jeffrey Brillhart join the ensemble for works by Joseph Jongen, Josef Rheinberger, and Maestro Brossé.  That's this Sunday, Feb. 16, 5 to 6 pm on WRTI. Join us!

Program:

Joseph Jongen: Hymne, Op. 78 (1924) - Matthew Glandorf, organ

Love has inspired composers through the centuries, with the tragic story of Romeo and Juliet probably the most popular. Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, Gounod, Berlioz, and Kabalevsky all wrote rchestral works, ballets and, operas based on that story, not to mention Nino Rota's film score.

Even Leonard Bernstein’s West Side Story was inspired by the doomed lovers.

WRTI will sample all of them on Valentine’s Day…and bring you other musical love scores, from Ravel’s Daphnis and Chloe, to Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess, and Wagner's Tristan and Isolde.

First up in this month's Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia concert is Metropolitan Opera Principal Clarinet Anthony McGill, who joins the ensemble for a performance of Mozart's sublime Clarinet Concerto, K. 622. Then, cellist Sara Sant'Ambrogio of the famed Eroica Trio, plays Robert Schumann's Cello Concerto in A minor. Music Director Dirk Brossé conducts the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia.  

Join us to hear a chamber music concert recorded live at the Wolf Trap Performing Arts Center.  We'll hear a new work by American-born and Curtis-trained composer Mohammed Fairouz. Violinist Rachel Barton Pine will play his Sonata for Solo Violin. 

Also on the program is pianist Joyce Yang playing Lowell Liebermann's Gargoyles.  

Beethoven's Grosse Fuge, despite being misunderstood and under-appreciated for years, has earned a place of its own in the chamber music repertoire.  Originally the final movement of his Op. 130 String Quartet in B-flat, Beethoven wrote another finale for that quartet, and published the Great Fugue separately, at least in part because of the enormous demands the work placed on performers.

London-based, period-instrument ensemble Arcangelo presents a program of works by J. S. Bach and J. C. Bach, as well as Handel’s mythological tale of unrequited love, Apollo e Dafne, one of his most ambitious cantatas that set the stage for the brilliant operatic career that followed in the next 30 years of his life. Russian violinist Alina Ibragimova is the soloist in Bach's Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in A minor.

Arcangelo was founded in 2010 by the English conductor Jonathan Cohen. It has since recorded several albums and has appeared at various venues and early-music festivals throughout the UK and Europe.  This program is a broadcast of their concert this past Monday at Carnegie Hall.  Hear the live, recorded concert on Sunday, November 24 at 4 pm.

Program:

J.S. BACH: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in A minor
J. CHRISTOPH BACH: "Mein Freund ist mein" from Cantata: Meine Freundin, du bist schön
HANDEL: Concerto Grosso in D Minor, Op. 6, No. 10
HANDEL: Apollo e Dafne

Jonathan Cohen, Conductor and Harpsichord 

Alina Ibragimova, Violin 

Katherine Watson, Soprano 

Nikolay Borchev, Baritone

More information about the program from Carnegie Hall's website

This month's Applause broadcast, on Sunday at 5 pm with the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia under Guest Conductor James Judd, features music of Heitor Villa-Lobos, with guitarist Pablo Sainz Villegas playing the Concerto for Guitar and Small Orchestra, plus an encore.  

Judd then conducts the youthful String Symphony No. 9 by the teenaged Felix Mendelssohn.  Sunday, November 17th at 5 pm on WRTI.

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