Jack Moore

Classical Host

Jack has been in the broadcasting biz for over 30 years, and his career has covered every aspect of the radio industry from on-air hosting to programming, and from sales to management. His many years of experience include stints at radio stations in Philadelphia, New Jersey, and upstate New York, including six years at WFLN. Jack joined WRTI in 1997 as a classical host and has been program director since 2002.

At Glassboro State College (now Rowan University), Jack majored in music. He still maintains an active professional career as a violist and conductor and has been music director of the Ambler Symphony since 1996; principal conductor of the Orchestra Society of Philadelphia since 1997; and music director of the Olney Symphony since 2002.

Jack is a frequent guest conductor of orchestras throughout the region, including the Ocean City Pops, the Bucks County Symphony, and the Old York Road Symphony. He has also worked with educational and school orchestras in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland and has appeared with symphonies in Europe and Russia.

Jack can be heard on weekdays from 10 am to 2 pm, and on the first Saturday of each month from 5 to 6 pm.

Pages

Happy New Year!
9:16 am
Sat August 31, 2013

Musical Memories of the High Holidays with Itzhak Perlman: September 7 at 4 PM

Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur bring a flood of memories, many of them associated with music. In this one-hour special, the superstar violinist Itzhak Perlman shares a wide variety of recordings that have special meaning for him, including several of his own performances.

Ranging from classical gems to cantorial singing to raucous klezmer fiddling, the music will spark warm associations and an emotional response for all listeners.  Hear this beautiful music on Saturday, Sept. 7th, 4 to 5 pm.

WRTI Spotlight
12:04 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

2013 Labor Day Weekend Classical Countdown

Join us for this year's classical countdown! It's your 30 favorite classical works on WRTI thorughout the holiday weekend. Listen on Friday, August 30 from noon to 6 pm, Saturday, August 31 from 6 to 11:30 am, and Monday, September 2nd from 6 am to 6 pm. Check out the list below! And have a wonderful holiday!

ENCORE!
11:26 am
Fri August 23, 2013

On ENCORE: Keeping Score Finale & Chamber Music from Wolf Trap

Violinist Rachel Barton Pine performs R. Strauss' Violin Sonata in E Flat.

Join us Sunday from 4 to 6 pm for the final installment in the acclaimed music series, Keeping Score: 13 Days When Music Changed Forever,  and chamber music from Wolf Trap.

November 4, 1964:  The premiere of Terry Riley's "In C" at the San Francisco Tape Music Center. This piece, and the minimalist outpouring that it sparked, were a reaction to the rigid strictures of serialism and the stranglehold of the academic composers of the time. Hosted by Suzanne Vega and conductor Michael Tilson Thomas. Sunday, August 25, 4 to 5 pm.

Read more
ENCORE!
9:45 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

Talented Young Organists On Wanamaker Organ Hour: August 4th, 5 PM

Students from the annual Macy's/Sansom Foundation Organ Camp, July 2013

Don't miss our annual broadcast of the extraordinarily talented students who attended the Macy's/Sansom Foundation Organ Camp this summer. Instructors Alan Morrison and Peter Richard Conte coached the young musicians; we'll hear the result on Sunday's broadcast from 5 to 6 pm, recorded on the Wanamaker Organ at Macy's Downtown.  Peter Richard Conte and Jill Pasternak co-host the show.

Program:
Sigfrid Karg-Elert: Nun Danket alle Gott
Jordan Abbasi, organist

Read more
ENCORE!
12:58 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

Keeping Score: 13 Days When Music Changed Forever, July 28, 5 PM

Dmitri Shotsakovich (1906 - 1975)

January 28, 1936: The Publication in Pravda of the Article "Chaos Instead of Music."  This article signaled Stalin’s displeasure with Shostakovich’s opera Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk and led to the composer’s “redemption” in his Symphony No. 5.  This program will explore Shostakovich and the sometimes mutually beneficial, sometimes terrifying, relationship between music and the totalitarian state. Suzanne Vega and Michael Tilson Thomas host. Sunday, July 28, 5 to 6 pm.

ENCORE!
3:29 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia: Hummel and Mozart!

Anthony McGill

Two world-renowned soloists join Dirk Brossé and the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia for Sunday's broadcast at 5 pm. Trumpeter Alison Balsom plays the Concerto for Trumpet of Johann Nepomuk Hummel. Then, clarinetist Anthony McGill plays the Mozart Clarinet Concerto.  

Also on the program, one of Music Director Dirk Brossé's own works, the Elegy for Strings.  Dave Conant is host.  Sunday, July 21st, 5 to 6 pm.

ENCORE!
6:01 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

The Crossing Choir On WRTI: The First "Month of Moderns" Concert, July 14, 4 PM

Composer Santa Ratniece speaks with The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns.

Donald Nally conducts the first in a three-concert series recorded live in June. The Gulf (between you and me), a major project that has taken years of planning, brings together composers, a poet, an artist, and a variety of musicians from Japan and America to join The Crossing in exploring a particular theme: how we seem to hear what the earth is saying to us with the same, sad inability with which we often listen to those we most love. 

Tune in on Sunday, July 14 at 4 pm to hear the first concert in the series, recorded June 15th at the Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral.

And did you catch The Crossing's performance with The Rolling Stones on June 23rd?

July 14 Program:
Gene Coleman: Water of the Last Moment (world premiere)
Santa Ratniece: Chu Dal (Silent Water, 2008)
Tamar Diesendruck: Other Floods (2010)

With special guests Toshimaru Nakamura & Ko Ishikawa

Philadelphia composer Gene Coleman’s musical language is at times experimental, at other times minimal, often drawing on Japanese influences, improvisation, extended techniques, and Gene’s interest in architecture and structure to create a rich and unique sound world.

Composer Santa Ratniece has recently become one of the most important female composers in Latvia, creating some of the richest landscapes in choral music. Her works describe the deepest lakes, the bluest skies, the quietest plains in a kaleidoscope of sounds that both connects us to the subject and magnifies our distance from it.

Composer Tamar Diesendruck offers a transparent view of deconstructionism. Her setting of Giuseppe Ungaretti’s brief words moves from a fragmented landscape to a lush harmonic fullness as the words themselves fall together to reveal, ”I am illumined by immensity."

More information

Keeping Score on ENCORE!
9:25 am
Sun June 30, 2013

13 Days When Music Changed Forever: June 30, 4 PM

Igor Stravinsky

The premiere of Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring took place on May 29, 1913. The composer's completely original instrumentation and rhythms, and his use of dissonance, have made this work one of the most important of the 20th century, not to mention the riot and ensuing scandal that caused the Paris premiere to be one of the most shocking in all of performance history. 

Hear more about it on today's broadcast - Sunday, June 30, 4 to 6 pm.
 

ENCORE!
10:05 pm
Sat June 22, 2013

The New York Philharmonic: A Jazz Flavor, June 23 At 4 PM

Wynton Marsalis

All of the works in this Sunday's New York Philharmonic broadcast have a jazz connection. Igor Stravinsky's 1918 Ragtime for 11 Instruments draws its inspiration from popular music of the time, including jazz. Aaron Copland's jazz-steeped Clarinet Concerto dates from 30 years later, a commission from Benny Goodman. Wynton Marsalis has describe his "Swing Symphony" as a symphonic meditation on the evolution of swing, and prominently features the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, with the Philharmonic.  Alan Gilbert and Case Scaglione
 conduct.

Read more
ENCORE!
5:29 pm
Sat May 4, 2013

AVA Opera Theater And A Verdi Favorite! May 5th At 3 PM

Soprano Marina Costa-Jackson sings Amelia in AVA's production of Un ballo in maschera.

Join us on Sunday at 3 pm as Philadelphia's Academy of Vocal Arts (AVA) presents Giuseppe Verdi’s Un ballo in maschera. Drama takes center stage in this opera of political intrigue, based on a true historical event: the assassination of King Gustav III of Sweden. The king falls in love with the wife of his best friend and most trusted advisor. A love triangle turns deadly as jealousy leads to conspiracy, murder, and betrayal at a masked ball. Sunday, May 5, 3 to 6 pm.

Read more

Pages