Jack Moore

Classical Host

Jack has been in the broadcasting biz for over 30 years, and his career has covered every aspect of the radio industry from on-air hosting to programming, and from sales to management. His many years of experience include stints at radio stations in Philadelphia, New Jersey, and upstate New York, including six years at WFLN. Jack joined WRTI in 1997 as a classical host and has been program director since 2002.

At Glassboro State College (now Rowan University), Jack majored in music. He still maintains an active professional career as a violist and conductor and has been music director of the Ambler Symphony since 1996; principal conductor of the Orchestra Society of Philadelphia since 1997; and music director of the Olney Symphony since 2002.

Jack is a frequent guest conductor of orchestras throughout the region, including the Ocean City Pops, the Bucks County Symphony, and the Old York Road Symphony. He has also worked with educational and school orchestras in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland and has appeared with symphonies in Europe and Russia.

Jack can be heard on weekdays from 10 am to 2 pm, and on the first Saturday of each month from 5 to 6 pm.

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News and Views
9:21 am
Mon December 5, 2011

Curious about Classical? Our Hosts Share Some Interesting Musical Facts

Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
10:11 am
Sat December 3, 2011

Musical Jewels of Jean Sibelius

Gustav Mahler famously remarked that the symphony "must be like the world - it must embrace everything." This explains those disjunct themes delightfully butting against each other in his symphonies. What is often forgotten is that he said this to disagree with Jean Sibelius, who told Mahler that every part of a symphony must have a logical, ruthless interconnection with every other part. Not the world, replies Sibelius: a symphony is like the earth.

Program:

Jean Sibelius (1865-1957)

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
9:35 am
Sat November 5, 2011

Works by Lili Boulanger, Vivian Fine, and Florence Price

Nadia Boulanger is well known to musicians, being the Parisian teacher of many American composers, most notably Aaron Copland. But her younger sister, Lili, excelled as a composer despite battling sickness most of her life. She eventually succumbed to Crohn's Disease at the much-too-young age of 24.

Program:

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
10:00 am
Sat October 1, 2011

The Unique Russian Composer Aleksandr Scriabin

The word "unique" is overused, but Aleksandr Scriabin (1872 - 1915) was one unique composer. Tune in to hear two works of Scriabin that were written only ten years apart, but show the great evolution in his artistic identity - from modernist Russian to universal philosopher. It's the Piano Concerto and The Poem of Ecstasy of Aleksandr Scriabin on the next Discoveries...join us!

You needed a ticket to get into the funeral. All the services and all the tributes and all the writings bear witness that when Aleksandr Scriabin died in 1915, at the age of 43, Russia believed its standard-bearer of art had been taken away.

Ten years earlier, Russia could hardly have cared less.

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
3:19 pm
Sat September 3, 2011

Latin-American Orchestral Works

"I've been searching for these all my career!" The conductor from Argentina gazed at the more than 100 Latin-American scores on the desks around him at the Fleisher Collection - just a fraction of the works found by Nicolas Slonimsky in Central and South America. Gabriel Castagna had flown to Philadelphia to study these, and he couldn't believe his eyes.

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
1:01 pm
Sat August 6, 2011

Works by Ignaz Pleyel and Dmitri Shostakovich

Ignaz Pleyel had three strikes against him during the French Revolution. He was rich, he was a foreigner, and he worked for the Church. He was exactly the type of person for whom the Reign of Terror sharpened its guillotines. Even worse: he was an artist. Different despots use different tactics, but artists are usually among their first targets.

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
12:15 pm
Sat July 2, 2011

Claude Debussy Revealed

Maybe it's not fair, but we're going to play two works by Debussy that he never wanted us to hear. And we'll listen to one piece in a form he never heard.

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
1:38 pm
Sat June 4, 2011

Works by Friedrich Gernsheim and Engelbert Humperdinck

We're going to pick up the thread from last month's Discoveries and follow it a bit further. Felix Mendelssohn convinced two friends of his, Ignaz Moscheles and Ferdinand David, to work with him in Leipzig. Moscheles and David both taught Friedrich Gernsheim. We'll hear his music, and that of one of his students, who has one of the more recognized names of any composer.

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
12:01 pm
Wed May 4, 2011

Three Composers of Leipzig

Ignaz Moscheles

The famous pianist and composer Ignaz Moscheles sat next to the 15-year-old boy on the piano bench, about to give a piano lesson as a favor to the boy's father. In less than a minute, Moscheles, a sensation on the continent, lionized in England, one of a handful of pianists vying for that ever-shifting "greatest" title, knew that he was "sitting next to a master, not a pupil." He had encountered prodigies before, but never had he seen anyone like Felix Mendelssohn.

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
11:00 am
Sat March 5, 2011

Composer and Pianist Ferruccio Busoni

Ferruccio Busoni. He was the first to perform all 18 Franz Liszt Preludes together, the first to play all 24 Chopin Preludes together, and, over four nights in Berlin, he soloed in 14 concertos with orchestra. Fourteen. They couldn't invent words big enough to describe this new star among pianists. Not only did they call him star, but also sun, giant, and king - tripping over themselves to find superlatives.

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