Jack Moore

Classical Host

Jack has been in the broadcasting biz for over 30 years, and his career has covered every aspect of the radio industry from on-air hosting to programming, and from sales to management. His many years of experience include stints at radio stations in Philadelphia, New Jersey, and upstate New York, including six years at WFLN. Jack joined WRTI in 1997 as a classical host and has been program director since 2002.

At Glassboro State College (now Rowan University), Jack majored in music. He still maintains an active professional career as a violist and conductor and has been music director of the Ambler Symphony since 1996; principal conductor of the Orchestra Society of Philadelphia since 1997; and music director of the Olney Symphony since 2002.

Jack is a frequent guest conductor of orchestras throughout the region, including the Ocean City Pops, the Bucks County Symphony, and the Old York Road Symphony. He has also worked with educational and school orchestras in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland and has appeared with symphonies in Europe and Russia.

Jack can be heard on weekdays from 10 am to 2 pm, and on the first Saturday of each month from 5 to 6 pm.

Ways to Connect

Don't miss Sunday afternoon's broadcast of the Philadelphia Youth Orchestra.  Music Director Louis Scaglione conducts a program of Berlioz and Shostakovich, recorded February 21, 2016 in Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center.

Join us on Sunday at 5 pm for Applause! It's our monthly broadcast of the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, and this month features Music Director Dirk Brossé, and Conductor Laureate Ignat Solzhenitsyn conducting the concert, recorded in the Perelman Theater at the Kimmel Center. 

Widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music, the St. Matthew Passion is an oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias.

Don't miss this month's broadcast of Applause! It's The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia in concert. **Please note, this month's program will be heard on Saturday at 5 pm. Dirk Brossé conducts, and the orchestra's principal flutist Edward Schultz plays music by Malcolm Arnold.  Dave Conant is your host for the broadcast.

Jubilate! A Concert of Sacred Music presented by the Academy of Vocal Arts, is one of the most eagerly anticipated broadcasts each season. AVA’s award-winning resident artists visited three churches in the Philadelphia area last week to perform music of Mendelssohn, Mozart, Handel and more. And you can hear this program, Sunday from 3 to 5:30 pm on WRTI.

Don't miss Sunday's broadcast of the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia from 5 to 6 pm. Dave Conant is your host for a broadcast featuring the Orchestra's three music directors, in music of Gluck, Schubert, and current Music Director Dirk Brossé. 

If you missed your chance to see the Academy of Vocal Arts production of Montemezzi’s L’amore dei tre re, you can hear it on Sunday, from 3 to 5 pm on WRTI. Check out our Arts Desk feature all about the opera!

The opera, at one time extremely popular after its 1913 Philadelphia debut, is rarely performed today, and AVA Opera Theater brought it back into the limelight this season, renewing interest in an almost-forgotten masterpiece.   

You'll hear two sparkling Baroque cello concertos on this month's Applause! broadcast of the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, Sunday, January 18th at 5 pm. 

Some of the most talented young musicians in our region are members of the Philadelphia Youth Orchestra, now in its 76th season. Join us on Sunday, January 10th at 4 pm to hear The PYO's opening concert of the season, recorded at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall.

In this all-Beethoven program, Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia Music Director Dirk Brossé guides you through two works by classical music’s master. Both were written within the decade Beethoven became increasingly aware that his deafness was incurable. Guest soloist Hanchien Lee, who made her Philadelphia Orchestra debut at age 16, infuses the “Emperor” Piano Concerto with her trademark eloquence and virtuosity.

Pages