Gregg Whiteside

Classical Host

As one of New York City's most popular radio personalities, Gregg delighted listeners as WQXR FM's chief announcer and on-air host of the morning drive-time show for over 20 years. His credentials are lengthy - he is the former national voice of live broadcasts of the New York Philharmonic and the commercial voice of The Metropolitan Opera, New York City Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, and the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Former host of live intermission features for The Metropolitan Opera Radio Network, Gregg also narrated the PBS special Pavarotti and the Italian Tenor, Classic Views video magazine, the feature film Royal Kalibur, and the documentary Montserrat Caballe, Beyond Music. Gregg performed with F. Murray Abraham and George Plimpton in the Pierpont Morgan's 9/11 Memorial Tribute. The list goes on...

Currently, Gregg is the voice of PBS' series Keeping Score with Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony. He also produces and hosts the nationally syndicated music and information program Making Music in Monaco.

Gregg can be heard weekdays from 6 to 10 am. He is producer and host of The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcasts heard on Sundays from 1 to 3 pm. Sign up for Gregg's Sousalarm Club by sending him an email at Gregg@wrti.org

Announcement about selection of Gregg Whiteside as official weekday morning classical host on WRTI

Ways to Connect

Benjamin Ealovega

Guest conductor Robin Ticciati conducts The Philadelphia Orchestra in works by Robert Schumann and Wolfgang Mozart on this Sunday's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast at 1 pm. Pianist Jonathan Biss is soloist.

Tara McMullen

Be sure to join us Sunday, January 10th at 1 pm for our weekly Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast! Guest conductor Marin Alsop and pianist Jon Kimura Parker join the Philadelphians for George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. This is the original jazz band version, Ferde Grofe’s faithful orchestration of Paul Whiteman’s arrangement.

Violinist Christian Tetzlaff pays a return visit to Philadelphia for a performance of Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto on January 7th, 8th, and 9th with The Philadelphia Orchestra. We’ll look forward to the eminent violinist’s appearance at Verizon Hall with a rebroadcast of a delightful New Year’s program first heard on WRTI last January, when Mr. Tetzlaff performed Mozart’s sparkling Violin Concerto No. 5.

This Sunday's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on WRTI brings us a lucky survivor among Mozart’s earlier symphonies – many of which were forgotten after his death. The Symphony No. 29, which Mozart composed at age 18, is full of charm, elegance, and irresistible high spirits, and Donald Runnicles, in his second week on the podium with the Philadelphians this season, will conduct.

Our Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast should be a wonderful accompaniment to your holiday activities this Sunday, December 20th at 1 pm! It’s the Philadelphia Orchestra’s annual Glorious Sound of Christmas concert, a tradition since the orchestra recorded its best-selling Glorious Sound of Christmas album in 1962.


The wit and sparkle of Beethoven’s 8th Symphony, the nobility of one of the cornerstones of the cello repertory, Elgar’s Cello Concerto -  played by the German-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser - and the brilliant set of Haydn Variations that led the 40-year-old Brahms to complete his first symphony three years later are all yours to enjoy on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast.

Luke Ratray

Join us on Sunday, December 6th at 1 PM for The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert. This week, you'll hear a performance of Bela Bartok’s Violin Concerto No. 2, infused with the dance rhythms of Hungarian folklore, and played by the multi award-winning violinist Gil Shaham.


Join us on Sunday, November 29th at 1 pm, as WRTI’s fourth year of Philadelphia Orchestra In Concert broadcasts kicks off. And if there is a theme to this whole season it will be the inimitable “Philadelphia Sound” that has inspired composers through the years, and led to many world and U.S. premieres.

In the late 19th century, prominent composers began to emerge from countries that had not been center stage in international musical life. Among these leading figures were Jean Sibelius in Finland, and Antonín Dvořák and Leoš Janáček in the Czech lands.

One of the highlights of last year's Philadelphia Orchestra season took place in March, when Carol Jantsch, principal tuba of the orchestra since 2006, stood front and center on the Verizon Hall stage to perform as soloist in a work written for her – Michael Daugherty’s Reflections on the Mississippi. Janstch premiered the work two years ago, a piece that Daugherty calls “a musical reflection on family trips to the Mississippi River during my childhood.”

Pages