Gregg Whiteside

Classical Host

As one of New York City's most popular radio personalities, Gregg delighted listeners as WQXR FM's chief announcer and on-air host of the morning drive-time show for over 20 years. His credentials are lengthy - he is the former national voice of live broadcasts of the New York Philharmonic and the commercial voice of The Metropolitan Opera, New York City Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, and the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Former host of live intermission features for The Metropolitan Opera Radio Network, Gregg also narrated the PBS special Pavarotti and the Italian Tenor, Classic Views video magazine, the feature film Royal Kalibur, and the documentary Montserrat Caballe, Beyond Music. Gregg performed with F. Murray Abraham and George Plimpton in the Pierpont Morgan's 9/11 Memorial Tribute. The list goes on...

Currently, Gregg is the voice of PBS' series Keeping Score with Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony. He also produces and hosts the nationally syndicated music and information program Making Music in Monaco.

Gregg can be heard weekdays from 6 to 10 am. He is producer and host of The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcasts heard on Sundays from 1 to 3 pm. Sign up for Gregg's Sousalarm Club by sending him an email at

Announcement about selection of Gregg Whiteside as official weekday morning classical host on WRTI

Ways to Connect

This Sunday on WRTI, it's a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from last April at Verizon Hall with Conductor-in-Residence Cristian Măcelaru on the podium. The program begins with Sergei Prokofiev’s sparkling First Symphony, completed the summer before Russian revolutionary upheavals led to his departure from his native country for nearly two decades.

Join us this Sunday for a re-broadcast of a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from last April, that brings us two Philadelphia Orchestra commissions — Maurice Wright’s Resounding Drums, a timpani concerto composed for the Orchestra’s principal timpanist, Don Liuzzi, and the Clarinet Concerto by Jonathan Leshnoff, composed for the principal clarinetist of the Philadelphians, Ricardo Morales.

All three of the works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast were composed in Paris within a five-year period (1928-33), one by a German, another by a Frenchman, and the last by an American. And they all marvelously combine elements of serious composition with popular influences, notably from jazz.


Conductor, harpsichordist, and early music specialist Ton Koopman conducts The Philadelphia Orchestra in this Sunday’s re-broadcast at 1 pm. It's a Verizon Hall concert from this past March, during which Koopman teams with his wife, harpsichordist Tini Mathot, in a performance of C.P.E. Bach’s Concerto for Two Harpsichords, a boldly experimental work by a composer well-known for his innovation and dynamism.

This week’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast brings us a performance from early March, which saw the return to Philadelphia of pianist Hélène Grimaud, who performs a concerto close to her heart, the Brahms Piano Concerto No. 2

Credit: Vahan Stepanyan

Michael Tilson Thomas is on the podium for this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast from 1 to 3 pm on WRTI.

Credit: Dario Acosta

Vladimir Jurowski, one of the most sought-after conductors in the world, collaborates with one of the world’s most talented virtuoso pianists, Yefim Bronfman, in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5, the “Emperor,” one of the supreme achievements in the genre — this Sunday, September 18th at 1 pm on The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast on WRTI.

Three richly orchestrated works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast complete the series of concerts from last January celebrating the music of Vienna.

Vienna was a hotbed of musical evolution, and the second concert in the Philadelphia Orchestra’s three-part series of the Music of Vienna shows us how far the symphony traveled in that time. On Sunday, September 4th at 1 pm, Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Philadelphians bring you two symphonies composed about 80 years apart: Joseph Haydn’s 103rd, the famous “Drumroll” Symphony, and Anton Bruckner’s 4th.

Credit Mathias Botho

Join us to hear the first concert in The Philadelphia Orchestra’s "Music of Vienna" series, recorded live last January at Verizon Hall. Pianist Jan Lisiecki, an audience favorite at only 20 years old, will be the soloist in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4.