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Join us this Sunday to hear the breathtaking 2014 Philadelphia Orchestra concert featuring a program for all of our fans of Sergei Rachmaninoff! In this re-broadcast, you'll hear the Philadelphians perform Rachmaninoff’s choral-symphonic setting of Edgar Allan Poe’s haunting poem, The Bells, which received its U.S. premiere here in Philadelphia in 1920 with Leopold Stokowski conducting. Between each of the four movements of this magnificent choral symphony, Poe’s original text will be dramatically recited in English by actor Sherman Howard, to capture the full essence of the words and music together.

Lines point every which way on Now Is the Time, Saturday, February 6th at 9 pm. Mathew Rosenblum starts us off with Sharpshooter for orchestra, and then we scale it way back to Steven Stucky’s Dialogs for solo cello, from Caroline Stinson’s CD Lines.

This year’s One Book One Philadelphia selection is Charles Frazier’s novel Cold Mountain.  From now until March 30th, the Free Library will host a series of reading groups, lectures, cooking classes and more as part of this mass reading event. This year, One Book coincides with the East Coast premiere of the opera, Cold Mountain, adding a musical dimension to its literary litany. 

Macy's Grand Court Organist Peter Richard Conte launches Season 12 of the Wanamaker Organ Hour on Sunday, February 7th, from 5 to 6 pm with all-new shows! The Wanamaker Organ is the world's largest musical instrument and one of its greatest treasures, housed in Macy's Center City and played daily every day but Sunday since 1911.

If you missed your chance to see the Academy of Vocal Arts production of Montemezzi’s L’amore dei tre re, you can hear it on Sunday, from 3 to 5 pm on WRTI. Check out our Arts Desk feature all about the opera!

The opera, at one time extremely popular after its 1913 Philadelphia debut, is rarely performed today, and AVA Opera Theater brought it back into the limelight this season, renewing interest in an almost-forgotten masterpiece.   

On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday, February 6th, 5-6 pm... If it’s a small world, then the 19th-century world of American classical music was tiny. Last month we looked at George Frederick Bristow of New York, the first native-born composer to get a hearing from that new American institution, the symphony orchestra. Now we meet John Knowles Paine—for the second time; we heard his music on another Discoveries eight years ago.

WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on Sunday, February 7 at 1 pm features several works of a celebrated Russian composer, conductor and pianist who had a close relationship with the ensemble. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the concert will be led by someone with connections of his own to the music and the man.

On Sunday, February 28th from 4 to 6 pm, join us to hear The Crossing in Concert, recorded live on October 18th, 2015 at the Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill. Conductor Donald Nally is the host.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky is now known as a classical music giant. But in 1866, he was a young man who had switched careers and was tackling his very first symphony. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on this early work – titled by the composer, Winter Daydreams.

On Sunday, January 31st, 2016 on WRTI, listen to Gianandrea Noseda leading The Philadelphia Orchestra in a November, 2015 performance of Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 1.

Radio Script:

MUSIC: Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 1

Among Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s hundreds of compositions are 27 piano concertos. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the young pianist Jan Lisiecki, who is making his mark today, is drawn to their musical purity, emotional complexity, and sense of fun.

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