Frequently Asked Questions


Can I listen to  jazz and classical music on your website?

Yes. WRTI offers listeners two 24-hour web streams. Both of these streams are a combination of our regular broadcast programming and our HD-2 broadcast programming. Both streams are offered in the MP3 (iTunes) and Windows format.

You can listen on our website in two places: at the top of the homepage - and on every page of the website - there is a gray-colored persistent player that contains both the WRTI classical and WRTI jazz streams. Just click on the little gray arrow icon at the right of the player to view both streams.  You can also click on the "On Demand" button in our navigation bar, and then click on "Listen Live" to view both streams.

  • All-Classical Web Stream

Our classical stream simulcasts our 6 am to 6 pm classical broadcast programming, and from 6 pm to 6 am it switches to a variety of classical programming that is offered on our HD-2 channel.

  • All-Jazz Web Stream

Our jazz stream simulcasts our 6 pm to 6 am jazz broadcast programming, and from 6 am to 6 pm it switches to a variety of jazz programming that is offered on our HD-2 channel.


1.  Where do I find your playlists?
You can find complete playlists, arranged by going to our drop-down menu under the gray bar at the top of the homepage, and  under "Playlists and Schedules" selecting either "Search Classical Playlists" or "Search Jazz Playlists." 

Also, almost every program page includes the most recent playlist at the bottom of the page, as well as links to previous playlists.  You can find a list of Classical Programs here and Jazz Programs here. Finally, every page includes links to playlist searches in the footer in the On Air Info section.

If you still can't find what you're looking for, you can send an email to our programming department at Please remember to be as specific about the piece as possible, including the time and day you heard it, the host's name, the composer of the piece, and/or title.

2.  Can I request that a piece of music be played?

Yes, during our classical music program, At Your Request, which airs on Wednesdays, from noon to 3 pm. If you're a jazz fan, the All-Request Show airs on Wednesdays from midnight to 3 am. From time to time, WRTI creates special programming and solicits input from listeners for music selections. To share your thoughts with our programming department, send an email to our Programming department:

3.  Is there a way to purchase the music I hear on WRTI?

A lot of the music you hear on WRTI can be purchased by going to our website and searching for the playlist that shows you the music you heard on a particular day and time. When you find it, you can purchase the music online.  You can also purchase music in our WRTI Amazon Store.

You will not always find what you're looking for, though, because a significant portion of our programming comes from recordings that are no longer commercially available.

4.  Why can't I get your playlists in advance?

In accordance with our broadcasting and streaming licensing agreements, WRTI is not allowed to publish playlists in advance of broadcast.  While we know many listeners would like this information, we are legally bound to adhere to the terms of this agreement.

Weekday and Saturday morning classical playlists are available during and after the broadcast of each selection. The playlist is located in the right column on the homepage. For jazz from 9 pm to 6 am, playlists are available in the same way. For Jazz with Bob Perkins, playlists will normally be available the day after broadcast.

5.  How do I join the Sousalarm Club?

The Sousalarm Club is a popular daily feature on WRTI, heard every weekday morning at 7:15 am. You can request membership in the Club by sending Gregg Whiteside an email at You can also send a postcard to: Sousalarm Club, c/o Gregg Whiteside, WRTI-FM, 1509 Cecil B. Moore Ave, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19121-3410. Please include your postal address, so that you can receive your official membership certificate, and anything you'd like to share with your fellow listeners. Gregg will then let you know when you will be officially inducted into the club.


1.  Where is WRTI located? What's your mailing address and phone number?

WRTI is located on the main campus of Temple University in Philadelphia. Our mailing address is:

WRTI-FM (063-00)
1509 Cecil B. Moore Avenue, 3rd floor
Philadelphia, PA 19121-3410

Tel: 215-204-8405 (weekdays, 9 am to 5 pm)
Fax: 215-204-7027

2.  Who owns WRTI?

WRTI is a non-profit, member-supported public radio station. A broadcast service of Temple University, WRTI operates as a professional classical and jazz radio station. Temple University owns WRTI's broadcast license.

3.  Where does WRTI's support come from?

Eighty percent of WRTI's annual cash budget comes from the community, including its 17,000 members  and underwriters - 65% comes from members, and 17% comes from underwriters. Additional support comes from Temple University and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and miscellaneous grants.  It takes $12,834/day to operate the station. Your support is essential!

4.  Is WRTI a student station?

WRTI's license is held by Temple University. The station has 24 full-time professional staff members who, together with part-time, volunteer, and student staff, work to deliver the high-quality classical music and jazz programming you hear every day. Until the mid '80s, WRTI was a student station. Temple University currently has a student station, WHIP, that broadcasts on its Main Campus for approximately 12 hours a day.

5.  Where do I send a check to?

Checks can be sent to:
WRTI-FM, Temple University, P.O. Box 827270, Philadelphia, PA 19182-7270


1.  What is"underwriting" and how can my organization underwrite on WRTI?

If your company is looking for an on-air presence at WRTI, our underwriting department can help. As a public radio station we do not sell commercials; instead, WRTI acknowledges corporate contributions with 30-second underwriting announcements. To request a media kit, contact Rick Torpey, WRTI's Corporate Support Manager:

2.  How do I get my PSA (public service announcement) on the air?

Our guidelines include airing public service announcements for non-profit services only; we don't air PSAs for performances or concerts. Also, we cannot guarantee that each request will run. Electronic PSAs can be sent to


1. Why does WRTI have on-air member drives?

Membership income makes up the largest portion of WRTI's revenue, and the majority of WRTI's membership fundraising is accomplished through the mail and via its website. WRTI conducts several on-air member drives each year because they are the most effective and efficient way of communicating with our loyal listeners who are likely to support the station. Public radio is supported by listeners who value and listen to the programming. Eighty percent of WRTI's cash revenue comes from its 17,000 active members (listeners who have made contributions within the last 12 months), and underwriters; the remainder comes from grants, including support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and Temple University.


1. What is High Definition (HD) Radio?

For information about HD radio visit our HD Radio FAQ page.

2.  How do I improve my reception of WRTI?

Poor reception can be due to any number of factors, including geography, atmosphere, signal strength, or your radio itself. The first step is always to reorient your antenna. If your radio doesn't have an antenna, consider getting one. An antenna that amplifies a weak incoming signal will often help. If an antenna is not in your future, try moving your radio to a different location: In general the higher the better.

3. I've heard a lot about satellite radio. What is it and how does it affect WRTI?

Satellite radio is a commercial service available on special receivers that consumers purchase for their cars or homes. These receivers connect to 100 channels or more from a satellite signal that is available across the U.S. While this means that you can listen to channels from across the country, we believe it also takes away one of the most meaningful aspects of radio; localization. If you tune into a channel from another city, you won't hear WRTI's local programming, including information about upcoming concerts in your town, or the weather, or news from your area on satellite radio.

We believe that our relationship with the WRTI community, and the localization of our content, is an essential part of what makes our public broadcast service valuable to our listeners.