Afro-Cuban http://wrti.org en Mexico and Cuba in the Fleisher Collection http://wrti.org/post/mexico-and-cuba-fleisher-collection <p><strong>Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday Feb. 1st&nbsp;at 5 pm...</strong>&nbsp;The Fleisher Collection of Orchestral Music is not only the world’s largest lending library of orchestral performance materials, but because of the foresight of founder Edwin Fleisher, Curator Arthur Cohn, and the adventurousness of the globe-trotting Nicolas Slonimsky, it also contains hundreds and hundreds of Latin American orchestral scores and parts.<br /><br />As we’ve recounted on <em>Discoveries</em> before, Fleisher commissioned conductor and author Slonimsky in 1941 to travel throughout Central and South America for the purpose of adding music from these countries to the vast European and growing American repertoire already on the shelves of the Collection. Scores were shipped to the Free Library of Philadelphia, and the huge task of reproducing them began. Some of the scores were given outright as gifts; others, after photographic reproduction, were returned. Dozens of music copyists then began extracting the individual parts needed so that the works could be performed.<br /><br />This would have been familiar work for <strong>Candelaria Huizar</strong>, the composer, violist, hornist, and in the 1920s, music copyist in the library of the National Conservatory in Mexico City. He had already studied music as a child with the director of the Jérez Municipal Band. At nine the band took him on as a saxhorn player. He joined other brass bands, and when one of them traveled to Mexico City, he stayed there the rest of his life. He became a music copyist at the Conservatory, then librarian, and later, Huizar was professor of composition, harmony, and orchestration there. His <em>Imágenes</em> (Images) is a delightful look back at his hometown.</p><p>Joining him at the Conservatory was his countryman <strong>José Rolón</strong>. He studied music in Paris from 1904 to 1907, then came back to Mexico, and founded a music school in Guadalajara. In 1927 he returned to Paris to study with composer Paul Dukas and one of the great composition teachers of the 20th century, Nadia Boulanger. Rolón came back to Mexico again, taught at the National Conservatory, wrote music criticism and a harmony textbook, and composed the Piano Concerto we’ll hear today. This brand-new recording was made from materials housed in the Fleisher Collection.<br /><br />Born in Paris to a Cuban mother and Spanish father, <strong>Amadeo Roldán</strong>, after music study in Madrid, moved to Cuba at age 19. He was concertmaster of the Havana Philharmonic, founded the Havana String Quartet, and became one of Cuba’s leading composers. Roldán broke new ground with perhaps the very first percussion-only works for the concert stage, and injected new life into Western classical music with the sounds and rhythms of <em>Afrocubanismo</em>. His 1928 ballet <em>La Rebambaramba</em>, the <em>Suite</em> of which we’ll listen to, is a riot of percussion, soaring melody, and audacious orchestral sound.<br /><br />When Mr. Cohn suggested to Mr. Fleisher that his Collection needed to look beyond the standard repertoire and acquire symphonic works from other cultures, this is what he was talking about.</p><p> Wed, 29 Jan 2014 10:58:00 +0000 Kile Smith 6942 at http://wrti.org Mexico and Cuba in the Fleisher Collection