Rolf Charlston http://wrti.org en 60th Anniversary Classical CD Highlight: Schubert, Notturno http://wrti.org/post/60th-anniversary-classical-cd-highlight-schubert-notturno <p>Franz Schubert's <i>Notturno in Eb, D. 897,</i> performed by the Stuttgart Piano Trio, is featured on CD 1 in the WRTI 60th Anniversary Classical 3-CD set.<br><br>The <em>Notturno in Eb</em>&nbsp;or <em>Adagio</em> was probably written just one year prior to Schubert's death at the early age of 31. Although the work was published posthumously with the title <em>Notturno</em>&nbsp;(Nocturne), Schubert merely labeled it "Adagio" as it may have been intended as a movement in a larger work for piano trio. With the clarity and contrast of the piano and two, stringed instruments, listen for the simple, Schubertian melody to be exchanged.<br><br>In the opening, for example, the violin and cello sing a soft duet while the piano accompanies with rolling, harp-like chords. Then the roles are reversed as the piano takes the melody, and the strings respond with a pizzicato accompaniment. The <em>pianissimo</em> conclusion of this little night music drifts off into a nocturnal dream.<br> Thu, 19 Sep 2013 04:08:43 +0000 Rolf Charlston 6431 at http://wrti.org 60th Anniversary Classical CD Highlight: Schubert, Notturno 60th Anniversary Classical CD Highlight: Orff, O Fortuna from Carmina Burana http://wrti.org/post/60th-anniversary-classical-cd-highlight-orff-o-fortuna-carmina-burana <p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: 22px; ">"O Fortuna" from Carl </span>Orff's<span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: 22px; "> </span><em>Carmina<span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: 22px; "> </span>Burana</em><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: 22px; ">, performed by the ​</span><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: 22px; ">Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, Chorus, and Youth Chorus, and the Highcliffe Junior Choir, conducted by Marin Alsop, </span><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: 22px; ">is&nbsp;featured on CD 2 in the WRTI 60th Anniversary Classical 3-CD set.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 15px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; line-height: 22px; "><em>Carmina Burana</em>&nbsp;begins with a blast in the opening section, "O Fortuna"—Luck, Empress of the World. Then a quiet, rhythmic repetition follows, with a smashing conclusion about the forces of life controlled by Fortune and Fate. The 25th and last section repeats the first. What's between the bookends?</p><div><em>Carmina Burana</em>&nbsp;means "Songs of the Beurens," and are medieval poems, mostly in Latin, discovered in a monastery in 1803 in Bavaria. The musical collection includes the ephemeral pleasures of spring, health, drinking, gambling, and lust.</div><p></p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 15px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; line-height: 22px; "> Mon, 09 Sep 2013 22:46:14 +0000 Rolf Charlston 6433 at http://wrti.org 60th Anniversary Classical CD Highlight: Orff, O Fortuna from Carmina Burana 60th Anniversary Classical CD Highlight: Brahms, Tragic Overture http://wrti.org/post/60th-anniversary-classical-cd-highlight-brahms-tragic-overture <p>The <em>Tragic Overture</em> of Johannes Brahms, performed by the&nbsp;London Philharmonic Orchestra, Marin&nbsp;Alsop, conducting, is featured on&nbsp;<span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: 22px; ">CD 1 in the WRTI 60th Anniversary Classical 3-CD set.</span></p><div>"One weeps, the other laughs." So Brahms remarked about his two, contrasting pair of concert overtures—the jovial <em>Academic Festival Overture</em> and the <em>Tragic Overture</em>. The complementary overtures are like the masks of the Greek dramas: Comedy facing one way, Tragedy the other.<br><br>Although Brahms read Sophocles, Shakespeare, and Goethe, in the musical tragedy he is not telling a specific story, but instead is invoking a mood, an emotional impression. Two hammer chords announce and reappear throughout the overture. It is a dark and stormy overture. &nbsp;&nbsp;</div><p> Mon, 09 Sep 2013 20:29:08 +0000 Rolf Charlston 6430 at http://wrti.org 60th Anniversary Classical CD Highlight: Brahms, Tragic Overture