What You Don't Know About The Iconic Olympic Theme Song

If you watch the Olympic Games, surely you recognize the heroic “Olympic Anthem” that’s played on TV. But do you know the story behind this piece of music? Who composed it? How did it become so iconic? Well, here’s the inside scoop…

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2005 in Review

Dec 31, 2005

We'll take a look back at the past year in the arts in our region and bring you the highlights of news and events, and the people who made them happen. And what a year it's been. Together we've witnessed great performances and exhibitions and rediscovered so many great perennial treasures. We weren't just here, but also overseas, traveling with the Philadelphia Orchestra and Pennsylvania Ballet as they brought their art to new audiences in Asia and the UK and in Spain where we went on a voyage of discovery into the life of Salvador Dali.

With the New Year spread out like a blank canvas WRTI's Jim Hilgen gets New Years resolutions from people both famous and unknown.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

WRTI's Jim Hilgen previews the holidays with a look at what not to give as holiday gifts.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

With the cold of winter settling in around the region, WRTI's Jim Hilgen looks at homelessness in the city of Philadelphia.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

Walter Cronkite

Dec 6, 2005

On this week's Temple View a conversation with a person who was considered at one time to be the "most trusted man in America." WRTI's Windsor Johnston talks with legendary news anchorman Walter Cronkite about the past, current, and future of Broadcast Journalism.

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Now that we've all had our fill of turkey, WRTI's Jim Hilgen takes a look at holiday shopping trends.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

WRTI's Jim Hilgen looks at options and obstacles facing those looking to retire.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

This week on Temple View a Conversation with Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel. WRTI's Windsor Johnston talks with the internationally renowned author and Nobel Peace Prize winner about his experience during and after World War II.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

Meridee Duddleston talks with scientists and older musicians who applaud the benefits of playing music.

Oral sex among teens is growing more common. WRTI's Jim Hilgen looks at the rise of teen oral sex and its implications.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

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The Met Opera

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WRTI Arts Desk

Bagpipes often play at police and firefighter funerals, but they also play at celebrations.  And in Philadelphia --The Philadelphia Police and Fire Pipes & Drums play everything from Amazing Grace to the Rocky Theme to music in concert with The Philadelphia Orchestra.


With genius and grace, African-American slaves transformed bitter human experience into a beautiful art form called the "spiritual." One of the most haunting African-American spirituals, “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child,” was likely borne out of heart-wrenching tragedy: the forcible separation of parent from child.

It was the fall of 1802 when Ludwig van Beethoven confessed his nearly fatal despair about his growing deafness, in what’s now known as his "Heiligenstadt Testament." His music then took a daring new turn. WRTI’s Susan Lewis talks with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas about Beethoven's Symphony No. 3, "Eroica."

Marc Horn

Violinist Joshua Bell is in town playing Wieniawski’s Violin Concerto with The Philadelphia Orchestra, where he made his first major concert debut at the age of 14. Now, over 35 years later, he’s a celebrated soloist, chamber musician, recording artist, and conductor. 

A bestiary in the Middle Ages was a book of illustrations of animals, each accompanied by a moral lesson.   Sir James MacMillan’s musical bestiary for organ and orchestra is informed by his Scottish background, different musical traditions, and a sharp sense of social satire. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

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