Grieg’s Concerto as Passionate Love Letter: Pianist Lars Vogt

Edvard Grieg was just 24 when he wrote his only completed piano concerto in 1868. It's one of his greatest works, and launched his international career. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

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Television journalist Bill Moyers shares his thoughts on several subjects with WRTI's Jim Hilgen.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

2005 in Review

Dec 31, 2005

We'll take a look back at the past year in the arts in our region and bring you the highlights of news and events, and the people who made them happen. And what a year it's been. Together we've witnessed great performances and exhibitions and rediscovered so many great perennial treasures. We weren't just here, but also overseas, traveling with the Philadelphia Orchestra and Pennsylvania Ballet as they brought their art to new audiences in Asia and the UK and in Spain where we went on a voyage of discovery into the life of Salvador Dali.

With the New Year spread out like a blank canvas WRTI's Jim Hilgen gets New Years resolutions from people both famous and unknown.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

WRTI's Jim Hilgen previews the holidays with a look at what not to give as holiday gifts.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

With the cold of winter settling in around the region, WRTI's Jim Hilgen looks at homelessness in the city of Philadelphia.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

Walter Cronkite

Dec 6, 2005

On this week's Temple View a conversation with a person who was considered at one time to be the "most trusted man in America." WRTI's Windsor Johnston talks with legendary news anchorman Walter Cronkite about the past, current, and future of Broadcast Journalism.

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Now that we've all had our fill of turkey, WRTI's Jim Hilgen takes a look at holiday shopping trends.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

WRTI's Jim Hilgen looks at options and obstacles facing those looking to retire.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

This week on Temple View a Conversation with Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel. WRTI's Windsor Johnston talks with the internationally renowned author and Nobel Peace Prize winner about his experience during and after World War II.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

Meridee Duddleston talks with scientists and older musicians who applaud the benefits of playing music.

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WRTI Arts Desk

Mark Garvin

The classic Broadway musical Gypsy is back, this time at the Arden Theatre through June 25th with Philly favorite Mary Martello in the role of Mama Rose. The Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns asks why this character is forever fascinating.


Edvard Grieg was just 24 when he wrote his only completed piano concerto in 1868. It's one of his greatest works, and launched his international career. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.
 


A New Work Sings of Freedom with Understanding

7 hours ago

As we celebrate America this summer, a new choral work reminds us that American culture goes back way beyond 1776. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Spirit of the Winding Water.

Susan Lewis: What is America? A land of many ethnicities and cultures. But composer Robert Cohen took note that one of our oldest civilizations is also one of our least well known.

Robert Cohen: Native Americans have gotten the shortest stick, so to speak. There is an extraordinary culture and history that we’ve pretty much forgotten,

The symphony, as we know it today, underwent major changes from the end of the 18th to the late 19th century. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, two symphonies from two composers in Vienna during that time illustrate the range of the form.
 


The Second Violins Are Not Second Fiddle!

May 30, 2017
Jessica Griffin/Philadelphia Orchestra

A large orchestra usually has 30 to 40 violinists, divided into two sections. WRTI’s Susan Lewis talks with violinist Paul Arnold about the critical, but often unsung role of the second violins.

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