WRTI To Broadcast Philadelphia Orchestra On Tour In Israel, Austria With Host Gregg Whiteside

Maybe you can’t be there in person, but you’ll have a chance to listen to history being made in June. WRTI 90.1 and host Gregg Whiteside will bring you the excitement of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s upcoming 2018 tour to Europe and Israel during three simulcasts, each with a one-hour delay.

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An instrument dating from ancient times, the flute turned out to be the ideal voice to express what was in the heart and mind of composer Samuel Jones. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on his Flute Concerto, premiered this season by The Philadelphia Orchestra.

The Grammy Awards were handed out Sunday at Madison Square Garden, and Philadelphia artists cleaned up! Here’s a rundown of this year’s best recordings in classical music, jazz, and more. 

Henry Grossman; Courtesy of Bernice Horowitz

When Leonard Bernstein’s baton broke during a rehearsal of Candide in the early 1970s, who was summoned to repair it? Richard Horowitz, who at the time was principal timpanist of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra.

On January 22, 2018, we presented a special LIVE broadcast. Grammy-winning Jason Vieaux, “among the elite of today’s classical guitarists” (Gramophone), played with award-winning violinist Kristin Lee in the WRTI 90.1 Performance Studio.

Vanessa Briceno Photography

If you haven’t yet heard the resonant, rich sound of the solo double bass in concert, now’s your chance. On Friday, January 26th at noon, the superb, young double bass soloist and composer Xavier Foley will play LIVE from WRTI 90.1’s performance studio.

Dmitri Shostakovich, known for many dramatic works composed in the shadow of Stalin, showed a different side —one filled with humor and family ties—in his Piano Concerto No. 2.


Simon Pauly

This Sunday, January 21st at 1 pm, and Monday, January 22nd at 7 pm on HD-2, our Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on WRTI 90.1 brings you a work very familiar through recordings, but not often performed in the concert hall: Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis.

Three bagpipers from the Philadelphia Police and Fire Pipes & Drums join The Philadelphia Orchestra this week in performances of Maxwell Davies’ An Orkney Wedding, with Sunrise.

By 1938, clarinetist Benny Goodman was already known as "The King of Swing" — the leader of the most popular dance band in America at a time when swing jazz was America's most popular music. But nobody knew how it would be received in Carnegie Hall, America's temple to classical music.

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The Met Opera

Saturday, Feb. 24

WRTI Arts Desk

When Beethoven Traded Despair for Triumph

5 hours ago

It was the fall of 1802 when Ludwig van Beethoven confessed his nearly fatal despair about his growing deafness, in what’s now known as his "Heiligenstadt Testament." His music then took a daring new turn. WRTI’s Susan Lewis talks with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas about Beethoven's Symphony No. 3, "Eroica."

Marc Horn

Violinist Joshua Bell is in town playing Wieniawski’s Violin Concerto with The Philadelphia Orchestra, where he made his first major concert debut at the age of 14. Now, over 35 years later, he’s a celebrated soloist, chamber musician, recording artist, and conductor.  And the man who at the age of three first made music by stretching rubber bands across his dresser is still fascinated by the science of  sounds and  music's power to change lives.  

A bestiary in the Middle Ages was a book of illustrations of animals, each accompanied by a moral lesson.   Sir James MacMillan’s musical bestiary for organ and orchestra is informed by his Scottish background, different musical traditions, and a sharp sense of social satire. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

Maybe you can’t be there in person, but you’ll have a chance to listen to history being made in June. WRTI 90.1 and host Gregg Whiteside will bring you the excitement of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s upcoming 2018 tour to Europe and Israel during three simulcasts, each with a one-hour delay.

Born in New York City to Jewish-German immigrants, Lorenz Hart penned some of Broadway’s most haunting, sophisticated lyrics. He began collaborating with composer Richard Rodgers when he was 24 and Rodgers 17.

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