We'll Never Forget: Music In Remembrance of the Holocaust on WRTI

WRTI honors the memory of the victims of the Holocaust, and joins with those in our community who remember them, with special music throughout the day on Monday, April 24th.

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Passover passes, and remembrance continues on Now Is the Time, Saturday, April 8th at 9 pm. The composer and guitarist David Leisner tells the story, in Acrobats, of circus performers on a concentration camp-bound train who mistakenly end up at a circus.

Lancaster Listeners: This Is For You!

Apr 4, 2017
Credit: DiscoverLancaster.com/Terry Ross

Good news for all of our listeners in the Lancaster area. You can now enjoy classical music and jazz on WRTI at a new frequency in your region! It’s 106.3 FM on the radio dial. The emails have already been pouring in from folks throughout the area who are so pleased with this signal that's much clearer and more reliable. Happy listening!

Credit: Dario Acosta

Not to be missed! On Sunday, April 9th, WRTI’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast will come to you LIVE from Verizon Hall, with the start time an hour later than usual—at 2 pm. And Yannick Nézet-Séguin will be back on the podium for a concert highlighted by the return to Philadelphia of the young Russian prodigy, pianist Daniil Trifonov! Listen at 90.1 FM in Philadelphia or on our mobile app!

Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 4 is not very well known in America. But it has a strong connection with the Philadelphia Orchestra, which continues to mine the richness of the work. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.


Opera Philadelphia's production of Charlie Parker's YARDBIRD tells the compelling story of a legendary jazz icon in a way that's meant to broaden and diversify opera’s audience. The role of saxophonist Charlie Parker was composed by Daniel Schnyder with tenor Lawrence Brownlee in mind.

The Jazz Sanctuary is an organization that takes jazz into houses of worship and other nontraditional venues. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, founder Alan Segal says jazz and the spiritual community drove his recovery from a life-threatening crisis.

Jerry Stoll / Monterey Jazz Festival

You won’t find a blue-ribbon pie at this northern California fairground this weekend. But the place will be filled with multiple stages and wall-to-wall music. Here's Meridee Duddleston's take on the Monterey Jazz Festival.

Elgar dedicated his second “Pomp and Circumstance” march to him. Sibelius honored him with a whole symphony. But the person who inspired these accolades is not all that well known.

On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday April 1st, 5 to 6 pm. It almost seemed as if Wilhelm Peterson-Berger was never at home. Born 150 years ago, he grew up in a small northern Swedish town, Umea, nearer to Lapland than to Stockholm. He felt hemmed in and he longed for the wider world. When he discovered Edvard Grieg’s mix of moody lyricism, myth, and folk culture, he was transfixed. He knew that he must become a composer.

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WRTI Arts Desk

A recent recording of an opera that premiered in 1937 shines a light on a Polish composer. He survived the Holocaust, but emerged from hiding only to shun his earlier success. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Joseph Beer.

Despite being a Polish Jew, 17-year-old aspiring composer Joseph Beer won admission in 1925 to the prestigious Hochschule fur Musik in Vienna, which had a quota for both Jews and Poles. He was also allowed to skip the first four years of the curriculum to study composition in master classes, and went on to graduate with highest honors.

It was 1930, two years before Hitler became chancellor of Germany.

Jon Batiste on TV, in the Community, and in Philadelphia

Apr 23, 2017

A supercharged jazz musician has entered the public eye in a huge way. Jon Batiste leads the house band on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. He traveled to Philadelphia for the kickoff of Jazz Appreciation Month. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston has more.

On June 10th, 1942, Nazis swept in and obliterated the village outside of Prague. They killed the men, sent the women and most of the children to concentration camps, and burnt or leveled the entire town—even the cemetery.

He won the 2015 Grammy award for "Best Classical Instrumental Solo" for his album, Play, and he collaborates with musicians in a wide variety of styles. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on classical guitar virtuoso Jason Vieaux.


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