Symphony at 7 on WRTI HD-2: The Philadelphia Orchestra and More, Every Monday Through Saturday Night

Big news! We’ve just launched a new classical series every Monday through Saturday night on WRTI HD-2 and our all-classical stream. It’s “Symphony at 7,” leading off with our popular Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcasts every Monday night at 7 pm, plus a powerhouse lineup of orchestras and concerts Tuesday through Saturday night.

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Credit: Dirty Sugar Photography

Benj Pasek (an Ardmore native) and Justin Paul—best friends from their days at the University of Michigan—just won a 2017 Academy Award for writing the lyrics to the song "City of Stars" from the hit film La La Land. They're also Golden Globe winners!

Few inventions were as complicated as the atomic bomb. But the Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns discovered that Curtis Opera Theatre’s production of the John Adams opera Doctor Atomic couldn't be simpler—or more provocative.

Remember the Golden Age of Piano?

Feb 27, 2017

Think back to the years before mobile devices, record players, and radio—when people who wanted to hear music heard it live or made their own. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on the Golden Age of the Piano.

Credit: Jessica Griffin

The largest, lowest non-brass woodwind instrument in the orchestra evokes darkness, romance, humor, and joy. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more about the contrabassoon.

Maureen Malloy Remembers Guitarist Larry Coryell

Feb 22, 2017

I’ve had the pleasure of announcing many Larry Coryell tunes over the years. Larry, who passed on February 19th at age 73, was always relevant. In just the past decade he collaborated with other jazz greats like pianist Kenny Drew Jr. and the Wide Hive Players, and kept churning out solo releases.

Composer, jazz trumpeter, and community activist Hannibal Lokumbe, the Philadelphia Orchestra's Composer-in-Residence, has composed two intriguing works for string quartet that explore the lives of two heroic women, Anne Frank and Fannie Lou Hamer.  Check out the performances by Philadelphia Orchestra musicians on Saturday, February 25th at the African American Museum in Philadelphia and the National Museum of American Jewish History.

Two great sax players were born on the same day, just three years apart. On February 2nd, 1924, Sonny Stitt was born in Boston, and Stan Getz made his first appearance in Philadelphia on the same day in 1927. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, each had his own style that would influence future generations.

The artistry and athleticism of the ballet dancer can soar with a well-fitting pointe shoe. On a given weekend, members of three generations of the Jenkins family might be on the scene at The Rosin Box, a jewel-like shop on Sansom Street in Philadelphia, just a few blocks from Rittenhouse Square, where ballet slippers and pointe shoes are sold—and, where music lives.

Jessica Griffin

Hollywood may have typecast the bassoon as comedic star, but Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Bassoon Daniel Matsukawa fills us in on the instrument’s great lyrical expressiveness. WRTI's Susan Lewis has the story.

Larry Coryell, the jazz guitarist known as the "Godfather of Fusion," died Sunday night at a hotel in New York City, according to his publicist. He was 73.

Coryell was still performing more than 50 years after his first recordings. He played at New York jazz club Iridium on Friday and Saturday nights, and had plans for a summer tour with his fusion group The Eleventh House.

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WRTI Arts Desk

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J.S. Bach wrote hundreds of sacred cantatas for voices and orchestra on liturgical texts. One season in Bach’s life reveals some of the cantatas he thought would endure through generations.

The true story of a 19th-century swindler in New York City inspired not only an opera, but also a concerto. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Bramwell Tovey’s Songs of the Paradise Saloon for trumpet and orchestra.

Since it opened its doors in 1913, the Apollo Theater has survived a series of iterations, closures, renovations, and shifts in direction. Its allure as a venue for jazz began in the 1930s with the debut of Jazz a la Carte, a show with an all-black cast.

Jessica Griffin

Early solo viola repertoire was often played by violinists who also played the viola. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, that music today puts violists in the spotlight, including Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Violist Choong-Jin (C.J.) Chang.

The songs, or standards, known to us today as "The Great American Songbook" flourished from the mid 1920s to about 1950. Singer Carmen McRae popularized the term with her 1972 album, The Great American Songbook. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, a new book on the subject shines light on the role of jazz in the rise, fall, and rebirth of these great American songs.


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