What You Don't Know About The Iconic Olympic Theme Song

If you watch the Olympic Games, surely you recognize the heroic “Olympic Anthem” that’s played on TV. But do you know the story behind this piece of music? Who composed it? How did it become so iconic? Well, here’s the inside scoop…

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Jazz Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement

Feb 10, 2018

Join WRTI 90.1 as we recognize Black History Month by celebrating jazz artists and songs that were synonymous with the Civil Rights Movement. During regular jazz hours, we'll bring you this music and discuss its political connections.

Vern Evans

Music was her family business, but conducting became her very own dream job. Now known worldwide, Mirga Gražinyte-Tyla turned to conducting when she was 11 because she was too old to begin studying an instrument. And look where she is now...

Wow! Listen to this jazzed-up rendition of "Fly, Eagles, Fly" and you'll be soaring all day long with your Birds!


Are you an ecstatic fan of the Philadelphia Eagles? Heading to the big Super Bowl victory parade on Thursday? Well, we're celebrating, too...with our top 10 classical works that will leave you flying high!

The Philadelphia Eagles, my childhood team, last went to the Super Bowl in 2005—just months after my arrival in Philadelphia, after twenty years in New York City. My timing was amazing; four years later the Phillies would win the World Series.

Join us on Friday at 12:10 pm to hear mezzo-soprano Chrystal E. Williams, winner of Astral’s 2014 National Auditions, singing LIVE from WRTI’s Performance Studio.

This Sunday at 1 pm, listen to Joshua Bell play Bernstein in a 2013 broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it was part of a celebration of the Renaissance man who influenced so many, including Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

While you're celebrating the Eagles big win, we have the perfect jazz tunes to keep your spirits high. WRTI's Maureen Malloy has put together this playlist with the Eagles' victory in mind.

Lisa Marie Mazzucco

WRTI 90.1 was proud to present the world-renowned Daedalus Quartet LIVE in our performance studio, on Friday, February 2, at 12 noon, for a program of Beethoven’s String Quartets—they're among the most profound works of chamber music ever written.

On Sunday, it's a program that traces an arc from Schubert’s Rosamunde Overture to the Symphony No. 2 by Brahms, by way of a World Premiere performance of Samuel Jones’s Flute Concerto, written for—and played by—Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Flute Jeffrey Khaner.

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The Met Opera

Saturdays, 1 PM

WRTI Arts Desk

Bagpipes often play at police and firefighter funerals, but they also play at celebrations.  And in Philadelphia --The Philadelphia Police and Fire Pipes & Drums play everything from Amazing Grace to the Rocky Theme to music in concert with The Philadelphia Orchestra.


With genius and grace, African-American slaves transformed bitter human experience into a beautiful art form called the "spiritual." One of the most haunting African-American spirituals, “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child,” was likely borne out of heart-wrenching tragedy: the forcible separation of parent from child.

It was the fall of 1802 when Ludwig van Beethoven confessed his nearly fatal despair about his growing deafness, in what’s now known as his "Heiligenstadt Testament." His music then took a daring new turn. WRTI’s Susan Lewis talks with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas about Beethoven's Symphony No. 3, "Eroica."

Marc Horn

Violinist Joshua Bell is in town playing Wieniawski’s Violin Concerto with The Philadelphia Orchestra, where he made his first major concert debut at the age of 14. Now, over 35 years later, he’s a celebrated soloist, chamber musician, recording artist, and conductor. 

A bestiary in the Middle Ages was a book of illustrations of animals, each accompanied by a moral lesson.   Sir James MacMillan’s musical bestiary for organ and orchestra is informed by his Scottish background, different musical traditions, and a sharp sense of social satire. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

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