The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI: Bramwell Tovey and Alison Balsom! March 26th at 1 PM

Join us for a re-broadcast of a fabulous performance from 2015 featuring British composer, conductor, and pianist Bramwell Tovey performing in all three roles!

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It took ten years to write Whisper Not, The Autobiography of Benny Golson, by tenor saxophonist and composer Benny Golson and his longtime friend, writer Jim Merod. Walking down the “corridor of life” Golson says, there are surprises, some delightful, and some not.

Credit: Elias

Week Two of the Philadelphia Orchestra’s Paris Festival on WRTI offers a different aspect to a program featuring music-making in the City of Light: non-French composers who moved to Paris, and decided to stay.

Practice is a physical activity, of course, but it's also hard mental work — if you're doing it right. A new video published by TED Ed gets down to the scientific nitty-gritty of what good practice looks like, and what it does to your brain. (Think axons and myelin, not "muscle memory" — muscles don't have "memory.")

The documentary film The Music of Strangers, and a companion CD, Sing Me Home—from Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble— both snared 2017 Grammy nominations, and a Grammy win for the CD for Best World Music Album. WRTI's Susan Lewis has the story on the Silk Road Ensemble, a group that seeks connections across cultures.
 


Credit: Rob Shanahan

The trumpet was the instrument of kings, in court and on the battlefield. Today the orchestral trumpet is an instrument for virtuosos, and used for a variety of purposes. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

Josef Holbrooke by E.O. Hoppé, 1913

Two British composers populate this month’s Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday at 5:00 p.m. on WRTI. Josef Holbrooke and Alexander Mackenzie were well known and enjoyed success, but they often struggled to gain more than a foothold in performance circles. The reasons, however, were different.

C'est magnifique! The Philadelphia Orchestra’s three-week Paris Festival is on WRTI starting this Sunday, March 5th at 1 pm!  Six French composers, in works conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, are featured in Week One: Chabrier, Fauré, Saint-Saëns, Canteloube, Ravel and Florent Schmitt.

Join WRTI as we broadcast live—for the first time ever—from our performance studio this Friday, March 3rd at 5:30 pm, to help celebrate the 164th Anniversary of Steinway & Sons. WRTI and Jacobs Music present classical and jazz Steinway Artists on the WRTI Steinway Spirio piano, live on the radio! First up is Temple University faculty member Ching-Yun Hu in a LIVE, ALL-RACHMANINOFF performance. Kevin Gordon hosts.

Credit: Dirty Sugar Photography

Benj Pasek (an Ardmore native) and Justin Paul—best friends from their days at the University of Michigan—just won a 2017 Academy Award for writing the lyrics to the song "City of Stars" from the hit film La La Land. They're also Golden Globe winners!

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WRTI Arts Desk

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J.S. Bach wrote hundreds of sacred cantatas for voices and orchestra on liturgical texts. One season in Bach’s life reveals some of the cantatas he thought would endure through generations.

The true story of a 19th-century swindler in New York City inspired not only an opera, but also a concerto. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Bramwell Tovey’s Songs of the Paradise Saloon for trumpet and orchestra.

Since it opened its doors in 1913, the Apollo Theater has survived a series of iterations, closures, renovations, and shifts in direction. Its allure as a venue for jazz began in the 1930s with the debut of Jazz a la Carte, a show with an all-black cast.

Jessica Griffin

Early solo viola repertoire was often played by violinists who also played the viola. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, that music today puts violists in the spotlight, including Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Violist Choong-Jin (C.J.) Chang.

The songs, or standards, known to us today as "The Great American Songbook" flourished from the mid 1920s to about 1950. Singer Carmen McRae popularized the term with her 1972 album, The Great American Songbook. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, a new book on the subject shines light on the role of jazz in the rise, fall, and rebirth of these great American songs.


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