WRTI To Broadcast Philadelphia Orchestra On Tour In Israel, Austria With Host Gregg Whiteside

Maybe you can’t be there in person, but you’ll have a chance to listen to history being made in June. WRTI 90.1 and host Gregg Whiteside will bring you the excitement of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s upcoming 2018 tour to Europe and Israel during three simulcasts, each with a one-hour delay.

Read More

The Philadelphia Eagles, my childhood team, last went to the Super Bowl in 2005—just months after my arrival in Philadelphia, after twenty years in New York City. My timing was amazing; four years later the Phillies would win the World Series.

Join us on Friday at 12:10 pm to hear mezzo-soprano Chrystal E. Williams, winner of Astral’s 2014 National Auditions, singing LIVE from WRTI’s Performance Studio.

This Sunday at 1 pm, listen to Joshua Bell play Bernstein in a 2013 broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it was part of a celebration of the Renaissance man who influenced so many, including Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

While you're celebrating the Eagles big win, we have the perfect jazz tunes to keep your spirits high. WRTI's Maureen Malloy has put together this playlist with the Eagles' victory in mind.

Lisa Marie Mazzucco

WRTI 90.1 was proud to present the world-renowned Daedalus Quartet LIVE in our performance studio, on Friday, February 2, at 12 noon, for a program of Beethoven’s String Quartets—they're among the most profound works of chamber music ever written.

On Sunday, it's a program that traces an arc from Schubert’s Rosamunde Overture to the Symphony No. 2 by Brahms, by way of a World Premiere performance of Samuel Jones’s Flute Concerto, written for—and played by—Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Flute Jeffrey Khaner.

Samuel Jones, an award-winning composer whose works are performed by major orchestras and choral groups around the United States, recently visited Philadelphia for the premiere of his flute concerto by The Philadelphia Orchestra. It brought back strong memories of how Eugene Ormandy mentored him long ago. 

There’s that video that’s made the rounds on YouTube for years—Leonard Bernstein not conducting the Vienna Philharmonic in the Finale of the Haydn Symphony No. 88. Right, not conducting: It’s an encore, and as the applause dies away, he starts the music, then drops his hands to his side.

It's so easy to find oneself attracted to the music of Franz Schubert. His unmatched gift for lyricism makes him so approachable, so comprehensible; and we feel ourselves being pulled into his musical world—in my case, at a very early age. 

When music’s biggest night blasted off Sunday afternoon in The Theater at Madison Square Garden, home— for some contenders—was just a short train ride away. Here are the Philadelphians who won Grammys, and the Philadelphia-based talents who helped the winners along.

Pages

The Met Opera

Saturday, Feb. 24

WRTI Arts Desk

When Beethoven Traded Despair for Triumph

5 hours ago

It was the fall of 1802 when Ludwig van Beethoven confessed his nearly fatal despair about his growing deafness, in what’s now known as his "Heiligenstadt Testament." His music then took a daring new turn. WRTI’s Susan Lewis talks with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas about Beethoven's Symphony No. 3, "Eroica."

Marc Horn

Violinist Joshua Bell is in town playing Wieniawski’s Violin Concerto with The Philadelphia Orchestra, where he made his first major concert debut at the age of 14. Now, over 35 years later, he’s a celebrated soloist, chamber musician, recording artist, and conductor.  And the man who at the age of three first made music by stretching rubber bands across his dresser is still fascinated by the science of  sounds and  music's power to change lives.  

A bestiary in the Middle Ages was a book of illustrations of animals, each accompanied by a moral lesson.   Sir James MacMillan’s musical bestiary for organ and orchestra is informed by his Scottish background, different musical traditions, and a sharp sense of social satire. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

Maybe you can’t be there in person, but you’ll have a chance to listen to history being made in June. WRTI 90.1 and host Gregg Whiteside will bring you the excitement of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s upcoming 2018 tour to Europe and Israel during three simulcasts, each with a one-hour delay.

Born in New York City to Jewish-German immigrants, Lorenz Hart penned some of Broadway’s most haunting, sophisticated lyrics. He began collaborating with composer Richard Rodgers when he was 24 and Rodgers 17.

More Arts Desk Stories