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Which recording of the famous aria "Quando m'en vo" also known as "Musetta's Waltz" is your favorite? Musetta sings the aria in the second act of Puccini's La Boheme. Please let us know in the comments section below! And listen to the famous 1956 recording of La Boheme conducted by Sir Thomas Beecham on Saturday, September 24th at 1 pm on WRTI.

Two Englishmen, Guy Wood and Robert Mellin, slipped it into the Great American Songbook just before it closed, just as rock rolled over sophistication. It begins from below, a slowly twisting Roman candle of a tune, and explodes in the top range of the singer, as the eyes of onlookers reflect the glory of what songs once were.

Credit: Vahan Stepanyan

Michael Tilson Thomas is on the podium for this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast from 1 to 3 pm on WRTI.

Born in North Carolina in 1926, saxophone player and composer John Coltrane spent over a decade in Philadelphia and then moved to New York. WRTI's Susan Lewis considers the impact of Coltrane, who expanded the boundaries of jazz with a wide range of styles.

While jazz giant John Coltrane was born and raised in North Carolina, and died in New York, he spent 15 years in Philadelphia. WRTI’s Susan Lewis looks at the role the city played in the career of this master sax player and composer, who would have turned 90 this month.

Talk to nearly any classical music critic about heroes of the trade and one name usually comes up: Virgil Thomson. Anthony Tommasini of the New York Times advises: "Every practicing and aspiring critic today should read Thomson's exhilarating writings."

When you think of an orchestra, you're probably picturing refined woodwoods, brass, and strings. But one ensemble I recently met is made up mostly of kids who play instruments made out of literal trash. This is the Recycled Orchestra from Cateura, Paraguay, and their group is the subject of a new documentary film.

It’s into the vault this Sunday for a January 30th, 2006 concert recorded in the Perelman Theater at the Kimmel Center, and conducted by then Music Director and current Conductor Laureate Ignat Solzhenitsyn. Join us on Sunday, September 18th from 5 to 6 pm to hear the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia perform Franz Schubert’s Symphony No. 9, known as "The Great C Major Symphony," to distinguish it from Schubert's Symphony No. 6  in the same key.

It’s back to school time, and for some, back to music lessons.  As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, music education is a particular passion of international superstar, pianist Lang Lang.

 

In 1930, The Philadelphia Orchestra gave a successful U.S. premiere of the 10th symphony of a revered Russian composer—Nikolai Miaskovsky—sometimes called "The Father of the Soviet Symphony." As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the work and the composer, both little known in America in today, are being championed by one of today's leading conductors.

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Kimmel Center Jazz Series Contest

Every pledge, TODAY ONLY, is automatically entered to win a pair of tickets to the Kimmel Center’s 2016/2017 Jazz Season.

The Great Migration

Bob Perkins hosts this series about the "giant steps" African Americans took from the South leading to changes in jazz.

Wednesdays from 12 to 3 pm

WRTI Arts Desk

Two Englishmen, Guy Wood and Robert Mellin, slipped it into the Great American Songbook just before it closed, just as rock rolled over sophistication. It begins from below, a slowly twisting Roman candle of a tune, and explodes in the top range of the singer, as the eyes of onlookers reflect the glory of what songs once were.

Born in North Carolina in 1926, saxophone player and composer John Coltrane spent over a decade in Philadelphia and then moved to New York. WRTI's Susan Lewis considers the impact of Coltrane, who expanded the boundaries of jazz with a wide range of styles.

While jazz giant John Coltrane was born and raised in North Carolina, and died in New York, he spent 15 years in Philadelphia. WRTI’s Susan Lewis looks at the role the city played in the career of this master sax player and composer, who would have turned 90 this month.

It’s back to school time, and for some, back to music lessons.  As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, music education is a particular passion of international superstar, pianist Lang Lang.

 

In 1930, The Philadelphia Orchestra gave a successful U.S. premiere of the 10th symphony of a revered Russian composer—Nikolai Miaskovsky—sometimes called "The Father of the Soviet Symphony." As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the work and the composer, both little known in America in today, are being championed by one of today's leading conductors.

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