Classical CD Selections: Mark Pinto's Summertime Roundup

WRTI's Mark Pinto fills us in on the latest classical music CDs on (most) Saturdays at 5 pm on Classical New Releases. Here are five newly released recordings he recommends. Take a look!
Read More

Vienna was a hotbed of musical evolution, and the second concert in the Philadelphia Orchestra’s three-part series of the Music of Vienna shows us how far the symphony traveled in that time. On Sunday, September 4th at 1 pm, Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Philadelphians bring you two symphonies composed about 80 years apart: Joseph Haydn’s 103rd, the famous “Drumroll” Symphony, and Anton Bruckner’s 4th.

Imagine you're a teenager in Beijing in the 1960s and '70s, during the Cultural Revolution. Everything that's deemed Western and bourgeois is banned — so listening to a 78 rpm recording of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, powerfully transformative as it might be, is off limits.

The symphony, as we know it today, underwent major changes from the end of the 18th to the late 19th century. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, two symphonies from two composers in Vienna during that time illustrate the range of the form.
 


Among the hundreds of outdoor sculptures that dot Philadelphia’s urban landscape are three classical music masters. But they're not where you might expect to find them.

Credit Mathias Botho

Join us to hear the first concert in The Philadelphia Orchestra’s "Music of Vienna" series, recorded live last January at Verizon Hall. Pianist Jan Lisiecki, an audience favorite at only 20 years old, will be the soloist in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4.

Join us this Sunday, August 28th from 4 to 6 pm to hear The Crossing perform Jeff Quartets: a concert-length set of 15 new works for four voices. Recorded in a session on the eve of their world-premiere concert performance, these poignant new works were commissioned to honor the legacy of The Crossing’s co-founder, Jeffrey Dinsmore, who died tragically at the age of 42 in April, 2014.

Jean-Baptiste "Toots" Thielemans, the Belgian-American musician who cut a singular path as a jazz harmonica player, died in his sleep Monday in his hometown of Brussels. He was 94.

Jazz orchestras are normally thought of as vehicles for standards, or dinner jazz. But, as WRTI’s Maureen Malloy reports, Philadelphia’s Fresh Cut Orchestra is anything but standard.

Mention the music of Vienna, and some of us automatically think of a waltz. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the city was a musical magnet for composers, especially from the late 18th century through the 19th and beyond.


From 2010 to 2015, composer and pianist Dave Burrell wrote 24 works inspired by his study of the Rosenbach of the Free Library of Philadelphia’s collection of Civil War documents and photos. The poems and lyrics of Monika Larsson also gave life to many of these compositions. Consulting with experts and scholars, Burrell and Larsson traced the route of Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train from Washington to Springfield, Illinois.


Pages

Listen every Wednesday from noon to 3 pm

The Great Migration

Bob Perkins hosts the WRTI series about the "giant steps" African Americans took from the South leading to changes in jazz.

Opera on WRTI

Listen every Saturday at 1 pm

Beep Beep!

Donate your vehicle to WRTI...
we'll turn it into music.

The WRTI Philadelphia Orchestra Page!

Sunday broadcasts on WRTI, interviews, musical insights,
special offers, and more

WRTI Arts Desk

The symphony, as we know it today, underwent major changes from the end of the 18th to the late 19th century. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, two symphonies from two composers in Vienna during that time illustrate the range of the form.
 


Rudy Van Gelder, the most sought-after audio engineer in jazz for decades, died last week at age 91. He was an exacting technician, but, as WRTI’s Kile Smith reports, there was something else in his recordings that he was striving for.

Among the hundreds of outdoor sculptures that dot Philadelphia’s urban landscape are three classical music masters. But they're not where you might expect to find them.

Jazz orchestras are normally thought of as vehicles for standards, or dinner jazz. But, as WRTI’s Maureen Malloy reports, Philadelphia’s Fresh Cut Orchestra is anything but standard.

Mention the music of Vienna, and some of us automatically think of a waltz. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the city was a musical magnet for composers, especially from the late 18th century through the 19th and beyond.


More Arts Desk Stories