A Fat Tuesday Music Parade - New Orleans Style - on WRTI! Feb. 9th at 9 PM

"Let the good times roll" with WRTI's J. Michael Harrison starting at 9 pm on Mardi Gras to celebrate the city that gave birth to "America's Music" - jazz! J. Michael will be the Grand Marshall of this Mardi Gras parade bringing you the best that New Orleans musicians have been offering throughout the years. Expect some early New Orleans jazz from Louis Armstrong and The Original Dixieland Jazz Band, the"pop" side of New Orleans music with Louis Prima, and even New Orleans-style jazz played by artists who aren't natives, but inspired by that wonderful town.
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When the young Robert Schumann fell in love with his piano teacher’s daughter, Clara, her father was not pleased and tried to keep them apart. How did they keep their passion alive? WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.  


The Curtis Institute of Music is in the midst of an all-school, all-year project for 2015/2016 devoted to avant-garde music that Philadelphians often avoided when it was new 50 years ago - works by the so-called "Darmstadt" composers. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns asks just how well the music has aged.




This year’s One Book One Philadelphia selection is Charles Frazier’s novel Cold Mountain.  From now until March 30th, the Free Library will host a series of reading groups, lectures, cooking classes and more as part of this mass reading event. This year, One Book coincides with the East Coast premiere of the opera, Cold Mountain, adding a musical dimension to its literary litany. 

Morris Robinson has the kind of bass voice that reverberates so strongly, you feel it in your concert seat. Listening to it, you assume he's been singing all of his life. And he has — but not opera.

On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday, February 6th, 5-6 pm... If it’s a small world, then the 19th-century world of American classical music was tiny. Last month we looked at George Frederick Bristow of New York, the first native-born composer to get a hearing from that new American institution, the symphony orchestra. Now we meet John Knowles Paine—for the second time; we heard his music on another Discoveries eight years ago.

WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on Sunday, February 7 at 1 pm features several works of a celebrated Russian composer, conductor and pianist who had a close relationship with the ensemble. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the concert will be led by someone with connections of his own to the music and the man.

On Sunday, February 28th from 4 to 6 pm, join us to hear The Crossing in Concert, recorded live on October 18th, 2015 at the Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill. Conductor Donald Nally is the host.

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WRTI Arts Desk

When the young Robert Schumann fell in love with his piano teacher’s daughter, Clara, her father was not pleased and tried to keep them apart. How did they keep their passion alive? WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.  


The Curtis Institute of Music is in the midst of an all-school, all-year project for 2015/2016 devoted to avant-garde music that Philadelphians often avoided when it was new 50 years ago - works by the so-called "Darmstadt" composers. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns asks just how well the music has aged.




This year’s One Book One Philadelphia selection is Charles Frazier’s novel Cold Mountain.  From now until March 30th, the Free Library will host a series of reading groups, lectures, cooking classes and more as part of this mass reading event. This year, One Book coincides with the East Coast premiere of the opera, Cold Mountain, adding a musical dimension to its literary litany. 

WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on Sunday, February 7 at 1 pm features several works of a celebrated Russian composer, conductor and pianist who had a close relationship with the ensemble. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the concert will be led by someone with connections of his own to the music and the man.

Two great sax players were born on the same day, just three years apart. On February 2nd, 1924, Sonny Stitt was born in Boston, and Stan Getz made his first appearance in Philadelphia on the same day in 1927. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, each had his own style that would influence future generations.

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